Title IX Definitions and Terminology

  • A Complainant is an individual who files a complaint to report a violation of policy. It also includes any person who is reported to have experienced a violation of policy.
  • A Respondent is an individual designated to respond to a report filed to Title IX.  Generally, a Respondent is someone alleged to be responsible for prohibited conduct as outlined in a complaint made by the Complainant.
  • Survivor Advocate: A confidential support person that provides individuals with options and resources so they can make informed decisions about their situation. They offer a safe, confidential setting to talk with individuals who have questions or concerns about sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or stalking.

 

Guilford College Sexual Misconduct — Prohibited Conduct 

  • Sex or Gender-Based Discrimination: Refers to the disparate treatment of a person or group because of that person’s or group’s sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.
  • Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment: “Harassment” is conduct that creates an intimidating, offensive, or hostile working or learning environment, or that unreasonably interferes with work or academic performance based on a person’s protected status, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. All such conduct is unlawful.
Forms of Sexual Misconduct

To review complete definitions and read the full Guilford College Sexual Misconduct Policy, please visit the policy here.

  • Sexual Assault: Having or attempting to have sexual intercourse with another individual by force or threat of force, without effective affirmative consent or where that individual is incapacitated.
  • Non-Consensual Sexual Contact: Having sexual contact with another individual by force or threat of force, without effective affirmative consent or where that individual is incapacitated. Sexual Contact includes intentional contact with the intimate parts of another person.
  • Stalking: Occurs when a person engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.
    • A course of conduct consists of two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which a person directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about another person, or interferes with another person’s property.
    • Cyber-stalking is a particular form of stalking in which electronic media such as the internet, social networks, blogs, cell phones, texts, or other similar devices or forms of contact are used.
  • Intimate Partner Violence: Includes any act of violence or threatened act of violence against a person who is, or has been involved in, a sexual, dating, spousal, domestic, or other intimate relationship with the Respondent. The College will not tolerate Intimate Partner Violence of any form. It is often referred to as dating violence or domestic violence. Intimate Partner Violence affects individuals of all sexes, sexual orientations, gender identities and gender expressions, races, and social and economic backgrounds.

 

Frequently Asked Questions about the Title IX Process

Complainant FAQs
  • How do I make a formal report of sexual discrimination or sexual misconduct?
    • To initiate a formal process, you must meet with the Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator. During this meeting the Title IX Coordinator will explain the College disciplinary process. The Title IX Coordinator will ask you to briefly explain what happened (e.g. who, what, where, when). The Coordinator will also discuss the availability of supportive measures such as academic flexibility requests, residence changes or other steps to assist you during the complaint resolution process. You have the right to have an advisor of your choice present during this meeting.
  • How long does the meeting take?
    • Although each case is unique, generally the initial meeting takes approximately one hour.
  • What happens after the interview with the Title IX Coordinator?
    • After the interview, investigators are assigned to your complaint. Depending on the nature of the case, one or two investigators will be assigned. For sexual assault cases, external investigators will be assigned to the case. Once the investigators are assigned, they will contact you to schedule an interview.
  • What happens during the interview with the investigator(s)?
    • Often there will be two investigators present during the interview. One will be primarily responsible for asking questions. The investigators will ask about what happened, requesting more details than during the intake interview with the Title IX Coordinator. They will also request the names of witnesses and other evidence that you might have, such as text messages, emails, or photos. You will have the right to have an advisor of your choice present during the interview.
  • Who will be informed about my complaint?
    • The Title IX office shares information on a need-to-know basis; those involved in the investigation and resolution of the complaint. Generally this includes the Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Coordinators, Title IX administrative assistant and the investigators. During the formal complaint resolution process, the accused student (respondent) and witnesses will be informed about your complaint.
  • Will my professors know about my complaint?
    • Often complainants request academic measures such as extensions on assignments and rescheduled exams. In order to preserve the privacy of students, we work with the Office of Student Affairs, which submits academic flexibility requests to faculty on behalf of the Title IX Office.
  • Do I have a right to appeal the decision?
    • Yes, both the complainant and respondent have a right to appeal the decision. There are three grounds for appeal:
      • A procedural irregularity so substantial as to deny the responding student a fair hearing
      • New evidence that could not have been known or presented at the time of the original hearing that is so substantial as to have likely impacted the outcome of the original hearing
      • Disproportionate sanctioning for the violation in question
  • How can the Title IX Office help me if I do not want to make a formal report? 
    • The Title IX Coordinator can assist you even if you choose not to go through the formal college disciplinary process. The Coordinator can arrange supportive measures such as academic flexibility including note takers, changes to residence, and other steps to assist you in achieving your educational objectives.
 
Respondent FAQs
  • What information will I receive about the complaint? 
    • You will receive information from the Title IX Office notifying you about the complaint during an in-person meeting. You will be notified of:
      • The complainant’s name
      • The specific policy violation alleged
      • Date(s) of the alleged policy violation(s)
      • Approximate time(s) of the alleged policy violation(s)
      • Location(s) of alleged policy violation(s)
      • Brief description of allegation(s)
  • What happens during the meeting with the Title IX Office?
    • A representative from the Title IX and Equal Opportunity Office will explain the College disciplinary process and your rights during the process. The representative will discuss any changes to your courses and residence that may be necessary during the process. The representative will also discuss the availability of supportive measures, such as academic flexibility requests, residence changes, or other steps to assist you during the complaint resolution process. You have a right to have an adviser of your choice present during this meeting.
  • How long does the initial meeting with the Title IX Coordinator take?
    • Although each case is unique, generally the initial meeting takes approximately one hour.
  • What happens after the meeting with the Title IX Coordinator?
    • After the meeting, you will be informed of the names of the investigators assigned to the complaint. Depending on the nature of the case, one or two investigators will be assigned. Once the investigators are assigned, they will contact you to schedule an interview.
  • What happens during the interview with the investigator(s)?
    • Often there will be two investigators present during the interview. One will be primarily responsible for asking questions. The investigators will ask about what happened, requesting more details than during the intake interview with the Title IX Coordinator. They also will request the names of witnesses and other evidence that you might have, such as text messages, emails and photos. You will have the right to have an advisor of your choice present during the interview.
  • Who will be informed about the complaint?
    • The Title IX office shares information on a need-to-know basis, e.g. those involved in the investigation and resolution of the complaint. Generally those that need to know include the Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Coordinators, Title IX administrative assistant and the investigators. During the formal complaint resolution process, witnesses will be informed about the complaint against you.
  • Will my professors know about the complaint? 
    • Often respondents request academic measures such as extensions on assignments and rescheduled exams. In order to preserve the privacy of students, we work with the Office of Student Affairs, which submits academic flexibility requests to faculty on behalf of the Title IX Office.
  • Do I have a right to appeal the decision?
    • Yes, both the complainant and respondent have a right to appeal the decision. There are two grounds for appeal:
      • Significant procedural error that significantly impacted the outcome of the investigation.
      • New information that was not available or known at the time of the investigation that could significantly impact the findings.
Responsible Employees and CSAs