Academics

Higher Education in Prison Program (HEIPP)

In order to deepen the commitment to our Core Values of community, diversity, equality, justice and stewardship, and offer a liberal arts education to inmates in North Carolina, Guilford College in partnership with the North Carolina Department of Public Safety offers coursework in two correctional institutions.

The Higher Education in Prison Program (HEIPP) brings Guilford College instructors to incarcerated women and men who provide courses in the fields of business, English, criminal justice, sociology, psychology and conflict resolution. The five-semester program provides students with an opportunity to receive 30 college credits and to take a preparatory course for the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green Associate certification exam. These credits are transferable to most schools that offer associate and bachelor’s degrees.

The program is offered in a men’s prison in Salisbury, the Piedmont Correctional Institution, and a women’s prison in Troy, the Southern Correctional Institution.

For questions, please contact HEIPP Director Barbara Lawrence at 336.316.2196. 

Breaking the cycle: The Higher Education in Prison Initiative

According to national statistics, one in every 31 adult Americans are either in prison, on probation or parole. Upon release, ninety-seven (97%) of incarcerated people return to a home in the ‘streets’ and more than half re-offend within three years.

Tiffany Kallam ’12 and professor of community and justice studies Barbara Lawrence developed an education program to break this cycle—the Higher Education in Prison Initiative.

“Many people leave prison unskilled and undereducated. Both factors correlate powerfully to recidivism rates, leaving them unprepared for life on the outside and a risk to public safety,” Kallam ’12 said. “For those who earn an associate’s degree while in prison, the recidivism rate drops to 13.7% and for those who earn a bachelor’s degree, the rate drops to 5.6%.”

“The Higher Education in Prison program brings Guilford College professors and tutors to Piedmont Correctional Institution in Salisbury, N.C. (men's facility) and the Southern Correctional Institution in Troy, N.C. (women's facility) to teach rigorous, credit-bearing courses in the liberal arts,” Professor Lawrence said. “Guilford College is committed to its longstanding mission to provide a transformative, practical and excellent liberal arts education for every student.”

The Higher Education in Prison Initiative was created in Lawrence’s course, Race, Society and Criminal Justice. Working with Professor Lawrence, Kallam ’12 was awarded a Principled Problem Solving (PPS) Partnership Project grant to bring the program to life. According to a program report, program outcomes include reducing recidivism, strengthening underserved communities, increasing employment, reducing poverty, saving taxpayers’ dollars and increasing human connectivity.

“Our strong collaboration with state officials and the Center for Principled Problem Solving has allowed this program to grow. Our goal is to ensure that the program can be sustained so that the recidivism rate in North Carolina is changed for the better,” Kallam ’12 stated.

The program made history on June 24, 2016, when six men at the Piedmont Correctional Facility took the LEED Green Associate exam, a national certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. It's the first time the certification exam has been offered in a correctional facility and we're pleased to report that four out of the six students passed the exam.

The North Carolina Department of Public Safety is considering offering programs in additional facilities, including the nearby Dan River Prison Work Farm, as well as implementing projects that will help make these and other facilities throughout the state become more environmentally sound utilizing HEIPP participants. All of this future work is inspired by Guilford's program. The U.S. Green Building Council North Carolina recently nominated Guilford for a Sustainable Business Award for this program we are offering with the N.C. Department of Public Safety.

The Higher Education in Prison Initiative is actively seeking Guilford students to serve as volunteer mentors and tutors. All interested students should contact Barbara Lawrence, blawrenc@guilford.edu.

Thank you to our dedicated instructors: Associate Professor Michael Dutch (business), Stephen Hill, Assistant Professor Shana Scudder (UNCG Assistant Writing Director) and Associate Professor Barbara Lawrence (justice & policy studies).

For more information about the Higher Education in Prison Initiative, contact Barbara Lawrence, blawrenc@guilford.edu, 336.316.2489.

Justice & Policy Studies

The Department of Justice and Policy Studies offers two majors: community and justice studies and criminal justice. The community and justice studies major focuses on policies and strategies of public service organizations. Taking an applied interdisciplinary approach, the department works with other departments and many community groups, to emphasize understanding public service organizations, problem-solving, values in public policies, civic activism and strategies for changing organizations. Graduates of the community and justice studies major have pursed graduate study and careers in urban affairs, public administration, law and related vocations. Graduates also have undertaken careers in community organizing and in nonprofit community service organizations focusing on mediation and conflict resolution, spouse and child abuse and similar issues. Many students look forward to civic activism, influencing policy in their communities and supporting their communities through service.

The criminal justice major focuses on policies, history and problems of the American criminal justice system. Graduates of the major may choose to pursue graduate study or careers in law, urban studies, public administration, law enforcement, courts, corrections or juvenile justice. Nonprofit community service organizations focusing on mediation, conflict resolution and spouse and child abuse are other options. Many students look forward to involving themselves in policy-making or careers in related criminal justice fields.

DEGREES OFFERED

The Bachelor of Science degree in community and justice studies and in criminal justice.

Justice & Policy Studies Majors

Community and Justice Studies

For students who enroll in the major beginning fall 2014.

The major consists of 40 credit hours (ten courses), as specified below.

JPS 103 Community Problem Solving - 4 credits
JPS 240  Group Dynamics and Leadership - 4 credits  
JPS 262 Restorative Justice - 4 credits
JPS 310 Public Management and Organizational Theory - 4 credits
JPS 339 Research Methods - 4 credits
JPS 448   Capstone Seminar I - 4 credits
JPS 449   Capstone Seminar II - 4 credits  

CHOOSE three COURSEs from (12 credits)

(one course must be at the 200-level; one must be at the 300- 400-level; one at any level) 

JPS 220   Community Building Fundamentals - 4 credits 
JPS 244   Conflict Resolution Strategies - 4 credits  
JPS 290  Internship - 4 credits  
JPS 301    Criminal Justice Policy and Practice - 4 credits  
JPS 313  Law and Society - 4 credits  
JPS 335  Reclaiming Democracy - 4 credits  
JPS 336  Oppressive Systems - 4 credits  
JPS 365  Race, Society and Criminal Justice - 4 credits  
JPS 405  Juvenile Justice and Delinquency - 4 credits  
JPS 424  Trust and Violence - 4 credits  
JPS 425  Family Violence - 4 credits  
JPS 440  Counseling - 4 credits  

Total credit hours required for B.S. degree in community and justice studies – 40 credits

Criminal Justice

The major requires a minimum of 40 credit hours (10 courses).

JPS 100 Inquiry into Criminal Justice - 4 credits
JPS 200 Criminal Procedure - 4 credits
JPS 233 Deviance and Society - 4 credits
JPS 339 Research Methods - 4 credits
JPS 480 Capstone Seminar - 4 credits

CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
JPS 202 Law Enforcement and Police Roles - 4 credits
JPS 203 Punishment and Corrections - 4 credits
JPS 204 Courts: Prosecution and Trials - 4 credits

CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
JPS 201 Criminal Law - 4 credits
JPS 202 Law Enforcement and Police Roles - 4 credits
JPS 203 Punishment and Corrections - 4 credits
JPS 204 Courts: Prosecutions and Trials - 4 credits
JPS 244 Conflict Resolution Strategies - 4 credits
JPS 250 Special Topics Pertaining to Criminal Justice - 4 credits
JPS 260 Independent Study - 4 credits
JPS 262 Restorative Justice - 4 credits
JPS/PSY 270 Interpersonal Communications - 4 credits
JPS 290 Internship - 4 credits

Two JPs 300 or 400-level courses (8 credits)
JPS 301 Criminal Justice Policy and Practice- 4 credits
JPS 310 Public Management and Organizational Theory - 4 credits
JPS 313 Law and Society - 4 credits
JPS 330 Criminal Investigation - 4 credits
JPS 333 Criminological Theory - 4 credits
JPS 336 Understanding Oppressive Systems - 4 credits
JPS 361 Philosophy of Law Enforcement - 4 credits
JPS 365 Race, Society and Criminal Justice - 4 credits
JPS 366 Justice - 4 credits
JPS 380 Victimology - 4 credits
JPS 400  Advanced Problems - 4 credits
JPS 405  Juvenile Justice and Delinquency - 4 credits 
JPS 425 Family Violence - 4 credits 
JPS 440 Counseling - 4 credits 
JPS 445 Police Brutality and Culture - 4 credits 

one jps course at the 400-level (4 credits)
JPS 400 Advanced Problems - 4 credits
JPS 405 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency - 4 credits
JPS 425 Family Violence - 4 credits
JPS 440 Counseling - 4 credits
JPS 445 Police Brutality and Culture - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for B.S. degree in criminal justice – 40 credits

Justice & Policy Studies Minors

Community Studies

This new field of study and practice arises from a pervasive sense of disconnection and isolation that has become widespread in American culture. Focusing on building community, the field understands our society’s institutions as on a path of systematically undermining respectful and authentic relatedness among citizens. It also sees this path as the source of many growing pathologies, including individual and systematic prejudice and discrimination and many forms of violence.

Currently, the need for community-building has begun to gain the attention and imagination of many inside and outside the academy. As new disciplines emerge and diverse technological and other forms of expertise expand, we are becoming aware that we still lack the ability to build sustainable systems that enable our endeavors to thrive.

The minor in community studies is not available to community and justice studies majors.

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

JPS 103 Community Problem Solving - 4 credits
JPS 220 Community Building Fundamentals - 4 credits
JPS 336 Understanding Oppressive Systems - 4 credits

CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
JPS 290 Internship - 4 credits
JPS 320 Ethics in Justice and Policy Studies - 4 credits
JPS 424 Trust and Violence - 4 credits
PHIL 377 Agency, Action and Motivation - 4 credits
PSY 213 Class, Race and Gender - 4 credits
PECS 345 Social Change: Promoting Peace - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for community studies minor – 16 credits

Criminal Justice

This minor provides non-majors an opportunity to pursue an interest in criminal justice. It introduces students to the major problems of instituting legal control over criminal behavior and the complexity of making legal decisions in a moral context. It enables students to develop an appreciation of the social scientific method and to communicate their experience with criminal justice effectively in writing.

The minor in criminal justice is not available to criminal justice majors. Students majoring in community justice may not use their major coursework toward the criminal justice minor.

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

JPS 100 Inquiry into Criminal Justice - 4 credits
JPS 200 Criminal Procedure - 4 credits
Two JPS 300- or 400-level courses excluding JPS 339 Research Methods, JPS 366 Justice and JPS 437 Multicultural Communication. (8 credits)

Total credits required for criminal justice minor – 16 credits

In addition to the course work, students will be required to write a five- to 10-page paper bringing together their diverse experiences in the minor. This minor summary must be submitted to the Department of Justice and Policy Studies during the semester in which a student completes her or his final course for the minor. JPS faculty will grade the minor summary CR/NC: CR is necessary for successful completion of the minor.

Interpersonal Communications

In an increasingly complex and socially diverse world, individuals need to be able to communicate effectively and to develop and maintain strong personal relationships with people close to them and from very different backgrounds. This interdisciplinary minor engages students in examining interpersonal communication in order to understand communication processes and styles and the subtle ways cultural differences enhance or inhibit relationships. Courses in the minor explore both intrapersonal communication (internal mental and emotional processes that shape selection and interpretation of communication) and interpersonal communication (the process through which individuals interact, build relationships and create meaning). Students study conflict and ways in which it can be managed and transformed to enhance relationships. The influence and importance of understanding cultural differences and their impact on interpersonal communications is examined throughout the minor.

The minor would be of special interest to adults seeking to communicate more effectively with family members, friends and intimate partners. Courses in the minor feature highly interactive and experiential activities in the classroom and local community that integrate and apply communications theory to authentic personal relationships.

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

JPS 270/PSY 270 Interpersonal Communications - 4 credits
JPS 244 Conflict Resolution Strategies - 4 credits
JPS 323 Diversity at Work - 4 credits
JPS 437 Multicultural Communications - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for interpersonal communication minor – 16 credits

Note: This minor will be offered only in the evening schedule for CCE students.

Organizational Communications

This minor provides substantive interdisciplinary focus on communication processes and systems that operate in organizations of all kinds and affect the performance of functional units and their employees with a vital impact on organizational outcomes, employee morale and teamwork. Research indicates that specific knowledge of internal and external communication processes is important for managers and employees at all levels. Courses in the minor draw upon theory and research from several social sciences with multiple practical applications to organizational communication and resource management.

Students choosing this minor will give sustained attention to the direct and indirect ways in which communication processes and social dynamics affect organizations and employee interaction. They will learn how to adapt communication approaches for colleagues, supervisors and interdependent work teams. This minor will have particular relevance for managers working in large and small organizations, including volunteer and non-profit groups, government agencies, law enforcement, social and health services, small businesses and large corporations. Students will gain greater understanding of organizational structures and communication processes and learn to be more effective as individuals, managers and members of work groups.

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

CHOOSE four COURSES (16 credits)
JPS 244 Conflict Resolution - 4 credits
JPS 271   Organizational Communication and Teamwork - 4 credits
JPS 323 Diversity at Work - 4 credits
PSY 332 Industrial and Organizational Psychology - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for organizational communication minor – 16 credits

Students pursuing this minor must write one paper of six pages in length in each of the four courses. Each paper will fulfill a course assignment and also provide coherence by demonstrating how key constructs and processes of organizational communication apply to the content and processes of the specific course.

Note: This minor will be offered only in the evening schedule for CCE students.

Justice & Policy Studies at Guilford

Why Justice & Policy Studies at Guilford?

The Department of Justice and Policy Studies offers two courses of study for students who wish to influence policy and support their communities through public service: community and justice studies and criminal justice.

In community and justice studies, students integrate scholarship from social theory with community engagement to investigate policies and strategies of public service organizations. An interdisciplinary approach allows students to work with other related academic departments and community groups to examine values in public policies, civic activism and strategies for changing organizations. Community problem-solving builds students’ individual and team communication skills while fostering critical thinking abilities. Students explore the processes for building community as a foundation for peaceful coexistence and responsive leadership.

Community and justice studies graduates have pursued graduate study and careers in urban affairs, public administration, law, social work, education and related vocations. Graduates also have undertaken careers in community organizing and in nonprofit community service organizations focusing on mediation and conflict resolution and other social issues.

The criminal justice major focuses on policies, history and problems of the American criminal justice system. Sociological, psychological and political-ideological thought are examined as students explore the questions of criminal justice policy and practice. Sociological jurisprudence and the legal system are considered as instruments of both stability and social change and the study of ethics, justice, discretion and organizational dynamics builds communication and critical thinking skills. This enables graduates to pursue careers in criminal justice fields such as law enforcement, corrections or juvenile justice as well as graduate studies in criminal justice, law, urban studies and public administration.

Experiential Learning Opportunities

 

“There is a strong emphasis on advocacy and community activism. The professors encourage you to get involved in areas you want to see change”
- Sarah Demarest ’09

 

Experiential learning is a cornerstone of the Department of Justice and Policy Studies (JPS) at Guilford. Students become active participants in the greater community, putting theoretical concepts to work in real-world settings. There are several opportunities for students in the JPS program to test their knowledge and skills outside of the classroom.

Applied Courses

The community and justice studies major’s introductory course, JPS 103: Community Problem Solving, offers students a chance to become acquainted with the grassroots movements that mark Greensboro’s civil history. Fall ’11 and spring ’12 students had the chance to take a tour of Greensboro communities and historic sites dealing with issues of social justice.  Highlights this semester included a guest appearance by Joseph McNeil, one of the “Greensboro Four” NCA&T students who began the sit-in movement ate the Greensboro Woolworth’s Department Store on February 1, 1960.

In JPS 350: Reclaiming Democracy students are encouraged to think about democracy on a personal level and explore ways in which they can put these thoughts into action. The class brings together community members, students and faculty instructors from colleges and universities across Greensboro. In this course students deal with two central questions: “How do we reclaim our democracy as a humane, inclusive process that is responsible to the needs of all members of our community?” “What does it require of us?” Students address these topics through research, discussion, interactive media and community projects.

Research Opportunities

For the past several years JPS majors have presented original research at the Guilford Undergraduate Symposium. Past research topics include:

  • participatory action research study on Greensboro resident’s perception of gangs and street organizations and the Beloved Community Center’s Paradigm Shift initiative to embrace the youth as a potential resource for peaceful, safe neighborhoods
  • participatory action research study on local police accountability
  • paper presentation from IDS 410 Power, Politics and Public Schools on significant issues impacting public education in Guilford County

Students have also presented their work at academic and community conferences beyond Guilford College. Recent opportunities include:

  • presentations of papers and projects by JPS faculty and students at the 19th Annual Conference on African-American Culture and Experience
  • presentation of participatory action research project on police accountability at the Lily Conference on College and University Teaching

These public presentations exemplify the practical liberal arts concepts central to the department’s mission. Through these opportunities, students integrate liberal arts, experiential learning and interdisciplinary knowledge to address real community issues.

Rehshetta Wells '17

Ymani Breedlove '19

Kristi Matthews '06 & Y'Dem Adrong '15

Josie Williams '16

JosieWilliams2016-2.jpg

“I’m working to build up community and economic development by empowering residents, promoting community engagement and upstream efforts that encompass health, education and economic stability.”

Learn more about Josie's work helping others with the Greensboro Housing Coalition.

Jennifer Campos Marquez '16

J_MarquesCampos.jpg

Greensboro, N.C., criminal justice major
Future Plans: Probation/Parole Officer
Post-Grad Plan Details: I may attend law school in the future.
Parting Thoughts: "In the end it was worth it all and, I would gladly do it again."

 

Kahlil Perine '16

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“If I hadn’t come to Guilford, I wouldn’t be where I am today. From the moment I started this journey, Guilford has been with me every step of the way—faculty, staff and students alike.”

Read more about Kahlil's journey to justice - he will start law school at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill this fall.

Wilbert Lennon, Jr. '16

Will Lennon.jpg
Greensboro, N.C., community and justice studies major
Future Plans: Will attend Bible College at Love and Faith Christian Fellowship
Post-Grad Plan Details: Continue to work for Parks and Recreation for the City of Greensboro
Favorite Quote: “No matter what obstacles or circumstances one faces in their youth; always remember ‘You can do ALL things through Christ who strengthens You’!”

Parting Thoughts: My time here at Guilford has changed my life forever. It has allowed me to overcome academic and social stigmas assimilated as a youth. I have become what I was consistently told what I would not be at this stage of my life and for that I am eternally grateful for my Guilford education and for God allowing it to happen.

Gerald Turner '16

Yanceyville, N.C., criminal justice major

Future Plans: Will attend graduate school at North Carolina Central University to study pre-law

Judy West '16

Greensboro, N.C., criminal justice major
Future Plans: Director of Business, Adult Center for Enrichment
Favorite Quote: “The journey is what you make it”

Parting Thoughts: My time at Guilford has been well worth my effort and the rewards are many.

Monica Williams '16

Burlington, N.C., community and justice studies and criminal justice double-major
Future Plans: Will attend graduate school at North Carolina Central University to study social work
Parting Thoughts: I thank God for all that I have learned and the opportunity.

Justice & Policy Studies Faculty