Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ

Q.

What is included in the cost of education?

A.

Average annual costs (tuition, books, fees, room and board, transportation, etc.) deemed to be necessary to attend Guilford. These figures are subject to change.

Q.

Since financial aid may not cover my entire living and educational costs, what else can I do?

A.

Seek non-work study employment. Use savings. Ask clubs, organizations, and churches to which you belong if they have any scholarship funds. Apply for scholarships. You may look for scholarship source books in the library or check at the Student Financial Services Office. Consider living at home or with relatives to save on rent and utility costs. You may also find additional resources at Fastweb.com.

Q.

Do I need to keep copies of paperwork?

A.

Yes! Keep copies of all forms completed and any materials used to prepare the forms, such as tax returns.

Q.

How much money do I need for books?

A.

You should always plan to have enough money from your own resources to pay for books, supplies, and other expenses during the first few weeks of each semester. On the average, books and supplies cost between $500 and $550 per semester.

Q.

What is Satisfactory Academic Progress?

A.

Federal regulations require that students receiving financial aid maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress to be eligible to receive financial aid each year. This requirement not only measures cumulative GPA, but also the percent of attempted hours passed. For more information, please see our Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) information in the Student Consumer Information Bulletin (SCIB) or in the Guilford College Catalogue.

Q.

Where do I take my financial aid questions?

A.

All pertinent financial information is covered in our Student Consumer Information Bulletin (SCIB) available online @ www.guilford.edu/finaid. In addition, five full-time student financial services counselors are available to answer questions. 100 percent of students demonstrating financial need receive some type of aid at Guilford College. Call 336.316.2354, 336.316.2176 or 800.992.7759 for more information about financial aid opportunities.

Q.

What financial assistance is available?

A.

Approximately 92 percent of the student body attend Guilford College with the assistance of scholarships, grants, loans, and on-campus employment.

Q.

Is there any consideration for sending two or more students to college at the same time (i.e. group rate)? How is this factored in?

A.

The federal need based formula takes into consideration the household size and number in college among other factors. Two in college would be reflected in the calculated family contribution.

Q.

What is considered in calculating how much my family can afford to contribute to my education?

A.

Congress has created a formula that takes a number of factors into consideration. Among them are a family’s total taxable and nontaxable income including the student’s income, family and student’s assets, the number of persons supported by the family income, the number of dependents in college, and the age and marital status of the parents.

Q.

If I receive a scholarship or grant will my need based aid be affected?

A.

Yes! The federal government requires that scholarships and grants be applied to your eligibility as calculated by the FAFSA. Any additional funding you receive from any source may require an adjustment to your eligibility for federal, or state aid, with loans and work-study affected first.

Q.

Can you get a tuition discount if you have more than one child at Guilford?

A.

No. None is specifically offered by Guilford; however, the federal formula does take the number in college into consideration when determining the amount a family is expected to contribute toward educational costs.

Q.

What if your previous year’s income is greatly inflated due to a severance pay from a company layoff?

A.

Contact the Student Financial Services Office. There is an additional form that can be completed to explain any special circumstances. Often, projected year income can be considered. These considerations are made at the family’s request and on a case by case basis.

Q.

What is the cut off for family income to allow a student to be eligible for some need based scholarships or support? Is that level the same for all universities?

A.

Since so many factors are taken into consideration when determining a student’s eligibility for assistance there is not a specific cut-off figure for need based aid. The FAFSA formula determines the estimated family contribution. This remains the same from school to school. Need based eligibility is determined by subtracting the estimated family contribution from the cost of attendance at each institution.

Q.

Whose income do you use for financial aid (father’s, mother’s or stepparent’s)?

A.

If a student’s parents are divorced, the income data for the parent and stepparent with whom the student lives is used to calculate eligibility for assistance.

Q.

In determining eligibility for need based assistance, what income figure is important (gross, net, or adjusted)?

A.

The adjusted gross income is used, plus any untaxed income.

Q.

If the parent is currently receiving Pell Grant money for community college attendance, what effect will this have on the child’s financial aid?

A.

Receipt of Pell Grant money by the parent will not affect the student’s financial aid. The income, asset and household information, including number of dependent children in college, will be used to determine the student’s eligibility for assistance.

Q.

What is the definition of an independent student?

A.

To be considered an independent student for financial aid consideration, you must be able to answer “yes” to one of the six questions in the Student Status section of the FAFSA. If you cannot answer “yes” to one of these questions, you are considered a dependent student and must include parental information on the form. However, if you feel you have extenuating circumstances and should be considered an independent student, you must file an appeal with the Student Financial Services Office. Generally speaking, most undergraduate students under the age of 24 are considered to be dependent and unmarried.

Q.

At Guilford College, the following situations are not usually considered to be valid reasons for independent student status:

A.

You do not reside with your parents;

Your parents refuse to pay for your college education;

Your parents are not financially able to pay for your education;

You do not want your parents’ help and have decided to pay for your own college education.

Q.

What do I do if my parents or I will experience a change in income or benefits for the coming school year?

A.

Contact the student financial services office for a Professional Judgement Appeal or write us and tell us about your situation. All requests for special consideration or adjustments to the student’s aid package must be accompanied by appropriate documentation. You will receive a written request if additional information is needed to process the Professional Judgement Appeal.

Q.

What should I do if I have not received an Award Notification from Guilford College?

A.

Call the student financial services office to verify that your FAFSA data was received. You should also check your SAR to make sure you have Guilford College listed as one of the recipients of your FAFSA data. If Guilford is not listed, contact the Federal Processor at 1.800.433.3243 or email them at www.fafsa.ed.gov to add Guilford to the schools authorized to receive this information. Guilford’s Title IV school code is 002931. Be sure to have your SAR available when you call. You will need to give the representative the four-digit Data Release Number (DRN) assigned to your SAR.

Q.

Who receives financial aid at Guilford?

A.

About 92% of all students receive assistance. Approximately 58% of the students receive financial packages that are based on financial need.

Q.

Will my aid change after the first year?

A.

Students reapply for need-based financial aid each year, submitting updated applications and financial documents. Awards may be adjusted (increased or decreased) to reflect changes in family financial circumstances, while self-help (job & loan) increases moderately in the upper-class years. Merit scholarships are reviewed for continued eligibility based on the required gpa.

Q.

What do you mean by a financial aid “package”?

A.

When determining if a student is “needy,” the Student Financial Services Office assesses the family’s ability to contribute to educational costs. This “family contribution” includes the parents’ contribution, the earnings expectation from the student, and 35% per year of the student’s savings and assets. The family contribution is then subtracted from the cost of education to arrive at the student’s need. The college then attempts to meet this need with a “package” of aid funds. This package may consist of a combination of grants, scholarships, loans, and work. This combination of two or more of these funds is called a “package”.

Q.

How does the Student Financial Services Office determine the “family contribution”?

A.

Although students and parents are primarily responsible for college costs, we know that each family’s situation is unique and, often, complex. Our goal is to determine a realistic expectation from each family, based on federal regulation and Guilford’s own policies. This expectation includes a parents’ contribution, a student contribution based on prior year earnings, and a portion of the student’s savings and assets.

Q.

What about students whose parents are divorced or separated?

A.

Guilford’s policy for calculating the financial need of students from divorced or separated families is based on the principle that both parents have an obligation to cover their child’s educational costs, despite any legal documents or decrees to the contrary. According to federal regulations, the financial aid information of the custodial unit must be used to determine eligibility for federal funds. However, for Guilford grants purposes, we may request additional information from the non-custodial parent to assess overall family support available to a student. A contribution is not expected from more than two parents, however.

Q.

Do I have to file for Need-Based Aid Every Year? When are the deadlines?

A.

Yes! Guilford College operates with a priority deadline of March 1 for new students and May 1st for continuing students.

Q.

What are some of the mistakes people make about financial aid?

A.

Four of the most common are:

Not filing early enough
Not reading the instructions
Not fully completing the applications
Not using the correct Social Security Numbers
Not signing all tax returns that are submitted to the student financial services office
Failing to provide both parent and student PIN numbers for Traditional Campus dependent students.

Q.

How can I find out about my credit history?

A.

Since approval of some non-need-based student loans and most parent loans is based upon credit history, you may want to order a credit report if you will need these loans to finance part of your family share. Check the report closely for accuracy and resolve any erroneous information prior to applying for educational loans. The following agencies can provide you with a credit report: Equifax Credit Information Services, 1.800.997.2493; TRW Consumer Assistance, 1.800.288.7408; Trans Union Corporation, 1.800.888.4213.

Q.

Should I wait until after I have been admitted to file financial aid forms?

A.

No! You should list any colleges to which you have applied on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), even though you haven’t been admitted yet. There is a turn-around time of 5-7 days after you submit your application online before colleges receive your financial aid documents from the processing center. If you wait until you are admitted you may not receive a financial aid package until much later. Since funds are limited at most institutions, consideration for aid is given first to those whose documents are submitted within the appropriate time frame.

Q.

What help is available to me if I do not qualify for any scholarships or other forms of aid?

A.

You can borrow money under the Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loan Program and principal repayment will not begin until after you graduate. Also, parents can borrow money up to the cost of their child’s education, under the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students Program (PLUS). There are also numerous alternative loans available from many major banks.

Q.

How will I know what types of aid I will be receiving?

A.

You will receive a Financial Aid Award Letter from the Student Financial Services Office. This will detail all aid for which you are eligible for the entire school year. You may not receive aid in excess of your cost of education.

Q.

How do I accept my award?

A.

You do not have to return the Financial Aid Award Letter to the Student Financial Services Office. You need only return it if you are declining any or all of the award. If you do not want to accept a certain award, you should line through that item on your award letter, initial it and sign the letter, and return it to the Student Financial Services Office. If you have decided that Guilford College is not the place for you, please let us know of that decision so that any funds that have been allocated to you can then be reallocated to another student.

Q.

My parents refuse to give me the information I need to fill out my financial aid forms. They say it’s nobody’s business. Am I out of luck?

A.

Contact the Student Financial Services Office at the College. Your counselor there can review your circumstances and explain your options.

Q.

I’m moving out of my parents’ house and will support myself from now on. Do my parents still have to fill out the financial aid application?

A.

Students under 24 years of age are considered dependent on their parents by federal regulation no matter where they live (there are limited exceptions–please note them in the FAFSA instructions). If your parents do not provide their information on your application, you probably cannot be considered for aid. If you have special circumstances, which make it impossible for your parents to complete the application, contact the Student Financial Services Office and discuss it with them.

Q.

I have a bachelor’s degree. Am I completely out of luck?

A.

No. You are not eligible for federal or state grants. But you are eligible for Federal Work Study and Stafford Loans.

Q.

What effect does withdrawing have on my financial aid?

A.

Depending on the time of the semester when you withdraw, withdrawal can seriously affect your financial aid eligibility. See refund schedule www.guilford.edu/finaid or contact your Student Financial Services Counselor.

Q.

How do I complete my Financial Aid file?

A.

You will need to complete all documents sent to you along with your award letter, or any other document request form. If selected for Verification, that process will need to be completed.

Q.

How do I know if my Financial Aid will pay for my Guilford College costs?

A.

Your Financial Aid Award letter will indicate the amount you have been awarded. Subtract that amount and any additional outside aid you expect to receive from your anticipated bill. Take into account, if you are awarded Work-Study, it does not count towards payment of charges. (This is because the student is paid directly once a month after submitting the appropriate time-sheets.)

Q.

What is the income cut-off for financial aid?

A.

There is no maximum income for receiving student financial aid. Individual circumstances such as family size, number of dependents in college, and other variables all factor in determining a student’s eligibility for assistance.

Q.

If I drop a class or fall below full time, whom do I contact?

A.

You should contact the Student Financial Services Office if you drop below 12 hours in any academic term. Additionally, students should consult with their academic advisor before dropping below 12 hours. A reduction in enrollment may cause a change in the amount of financial aid you receive. Note: In order to receive institutional Financial Aid, you must be enrolled at least halftime.

Q.

Does Guilford offer scholarships to transfer students?

A.

Yes. Transfer students are eligible for consideration for the same need-based grants, scholarships, loans, and campus work as our new first time students. For merit scholarships transfer students must meet the same application deadlines as incoming first year students.

Q.

Are scholarships awarded for one year or are there scholarships that are guaranteed for all four years?

A.

Scholarship awards made on a merit basis are generally renewable for subsequent undergraduate years provided you maintain the required Guilford grade point average. Need based aid must be applied for each year in order to be renewed.

Q.

Do you have scholarships for students studying in various academic departments or disciplines?

A.

A small number of endowed scholarships are designated for students studying in particular departments or pursuing particular majors. Generally, these departments select those who might be eligible for such scholarships during their junior or senior years.

Q.

Are there any scholarships for Quaker students at Guilford?

A.

Yes. Guilford offers scholarships ranging from $2,000-$5,000 per year to Quaker students who participate in the Quaker Leadership Scholars Program. This is a four-year program of course work, group sessions, experiential learning opportunities, and community service. For further information on this program contact either your Admission Counselor or the Coordinator of Campus Ministries.

Q.

Are there any scholarships awarded based on talent?

A.

The Music Department and the Theatre Students Department have scholarships based on the applicant’s ability and future promise. Interested students are encouraged to contact these departments directly.

Q.

Do you have a tuition program for future Guilford students that are now young children?

A.

No. However, a number of states do sponsor such college savings and pre-payment programs. For information regarding the availability of such a program in your state, and whether it is available for use at private colleges both in your state and in other states, you can contact the State Education Assistance Authority in your state. You can obtain that agency’s phone number and address through your state’s Department of Public Instruction or governing agency for your state’s public university system. In North Carolina you can get more information about the College Vision Fund by going to the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority website, www.ncseaa.edu, or the College Foundation of North Carolina (CFNC) at www.cfnc.org.

Q.

Do you offer payment plans?

A.

Yes. See the Payment Plans page for either Traditional or CCE students.

Q.

When are semester payments due and how are they typically paid (check, credit card)?

A.

Payment is due August 1 for fall and January 1 for spring. If the financial aid package has been finalized, any grants or scholarships will appear as a deduction from the student’s charges. Student loans are not applied to the student account until the week prior to the beginning of classes. The balance may also be paid at the time the invoice is received for each term. Cash, check, or credit cards are the accepted methods of payment. You may use our Monthly Installment Plan, which allows you to pay on a monthly basis any balance remaining after all financial aid has been applied. Our Monthly Installment Plan is being handled through Academic Management Services, feel free to check out their website, www.amsweb.com.

Q.

When will I receive my money?

A.

When your financial aid application is complete, the financial aid funds are credited directly to your Student Financial services account of tuition, fees, room, and board charges (with the exception of work-study and Bonner Grants.) If you have a credit balance on your account resulting from Stafford Loans or Outside aid, you can request a refund at registration and a refund check should be available in the Student Financial Services Office.

Q.

What is Work-Study?

A.

Work-Study is part of your financial award package that offers you the opportunity to work on campus. You are awarded a certain amount of money for work-study and you may earn up to that amount doing a campus job. Work-Study is not being paid to study.

Q.

How do I get a Work-Study job?

A.

All work-study students have access to the CLASSIFIEDS that lists all open campus work-study positions (found on Career Development section of Guilford’s website). Students are free to interview for and secure the job of their choice from those listed. Work-Study jobs are not assigned.

Q.

How do I know what amount I can earn?

A.

You should have received a letter from the Financial Aid Office with the amount listed. The award amount is also listed on the Work-Study Agreement along with the average working hours per week in order to reach that amount during the year.

Q.

What is Federal Work-Study and how do I find a job?

A.

Employment through the Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program is based on financial need as determined from data reported on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If you are eligible for the FWS program, the maximum amount you may earn will appear on the Financial Aid Award letter sent to you by the Student Financial Services Office. To receive FWS funds, you must obtain a FWS job and be enrolled for at least 6 credit hours. Your FWS funds will be provided to you via a paycheck for the hours you actually worked. FWS job openings are posted in the Student Financial Services Office. The job postings will provide information about the job, application requirements and an employer contact. FWS means that 70% of your total earnings will come from federal funds allocated to Guilford for work-study and 30% will come from the departmental budget of the office that employs you.

Q.

What does Institutional Work-Study mean?

A.

IWS means that 50% of your total earnings will come from institutional funds set aside for work-study and 50% will come from the departmental budget of the office that employs you.

Q.

If a student chooses not to accept work-study his freshman year, does this change his status or his chances of qualifying for financial aid (both need based and merit based)?

A.

No, eligibility is determined each year based on the information submitted on the FAFSA. You can also accept it for just your second semester.

Q.

Can I have two work-study jobs at the same time? How many hours can I work per week?

A.

Yes. If you cannot meet your total average hours per week through one job, you may add additional hours through another position. However, you must have a separate agreement for each position. Additional W/S agreements are available from your student financial services counselor or the Human Resources Office. Twenty (20) hours per week is the maximum recommended for academic reasons.

Q.

Can I change work-study jobs?

A.

Yes you can, at any point in the academic year. It is recommended that you give your employer at least two weeks notice. If you wish to change jobs, visit the employment section of the website to review the job openings and obtain the necessary paperwork. You will need to contact the Human Resources Office to complete the necessary paperwork.

Q.

Isn’t work-study money non-taxable?

A.

Work-study earnings are taxable income. If taxes were withheld from your paycheck you probably are eligible for a refund depending, of course, on your total annual earnings. It is in your best interest that you file a tax return with the Internal Revenue by April 15.

Q.

Can my fall/spring work-study award be used in the summer?

A.

No. You can not carry over any unused earnings to the summer. Your work-study award must be utilized by May 14th.

Q.

What happens when I reach my work-study maximum?

A.

Your department should notify you when you reach your award maximum. The department has the option of continuing your assignment and paying you 100% from their departmental budget or ending your assignment altogether. Most departments will make every attempt to keep you working with them, but you must be a good employee.

Q.

How much do I earn per hour?

A.

The majority of campus work-study jobs pay the NC minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

Q.

Can I obtain my total Work-Study award during one semester (double my hours?)

A.

No. The total earnings are based on two semesters’ worth of work. If you earn a little more in one semester, it is not a problem, but your earnings are based on two semesters and should be completed in that manner.

Q.

What if I decide not to use my work-study first semester?

A.

If you are not planning to work first semester but do not want to lose your award, you must notify your student financial services counselor and the Human Resources Office of your plans. Failure to notify will result in cancellation of your entire award for the year. However, if you do notify, you can still opt to retain half of your award for second semester.

Q.

How am I paid for Work-Study?

A.

You will be paid at the beginning of each month. Student pay periods run from the 15th of the first month through the 14th of the next month. (Example: hours earned September 15th through October 14th will be paid on November 1st via direct deposit to your bank account when you provide the Human Resources Office with your personal check upon which you have written “void” or when you complete the direct deposit form.

Q.

Can my money be automatically credited to my tuition and fees?

A.

No. What you earn each month comes back to you. It is your choice what you do with the money. You may work out some payment system with the Student Financial Services Office, but it is not automatic.

Q.

How do I keep track of hours worked?

A.

Each work-study student is responsible for keeping a time sheet on-line accessed through Banner web. You should fill out your time sheet as you go to avoid confusion right before it is due. Each day worked should be entered on the appropriate date, an “in” and “out” time with the appropriate am or pm selected. If lunch or dinner is taken between shifts, (which you are not paid for) then an additional entry with “in” and “out” is made. Remember to save that day’s entry. The total worked for the day will automatically be calculated once you have saved that day. Once you have completed entering your total hours worked for the entire pay period, you need to “submit for approval” by the 16th of the month (2 days after the pay period ends) so that it will be accessible to the approver. You should send an e-mail to your approver that the time sheet has been submitted. Some departments on campus may require you to also keep a “paper” time sheet which you and your immediate supervisor need to sign and then provide to the approver of your department time sheets. (Check with your supervisor for their requirements.)

Q.

What if I fail to turn in a time sheet for one month?

A.

THIS IS NOT AN OPTION. Banner Web on-line time sheets are accessible 24/7 from any internet connection. If there is a problem with your time sheet, you need to get in touch with swaimwg@guilford.edu via priority email so it can be ready for timely payroll processing. Online time sheets can not be retroactively completed by the student, and therefore we encourage you to enter your time on a weekly basis if you can not do so on a daily basis.

Q.

What happens if I reach my allotted award amount early?

A.

It is your responsibility to keep track of how many hours you have worked so that this does not happen. If you do reach your allotted amount early, you will have to discontinue working.

Q.

What should I do if I have a problem or concern about my work-study job?

A.

First talk with your employer about your concern. If you cannot discuss the situation with your employer, please come talk with your student financial services counselor. The Student Financial Services Office is committed to doing all it can to help you and your employer have a satisfying and successful experience. Confidentiality is respected.

Q.

Are loans available that can be repaid after graduation?

A.

There are several deferred loan options. A student should apply for financial aid and determine additional loan options once a financial aid package has been determined. Most federal need-based loans do not require repayment until after the student has either graduated or terminated enrollment for some other reason.

Q.

What is a Stafford Loan?

A.

The Federal Stafford Loan is a private lender, state/private guaranteed loan backed by the federal government. Interest rates are low.

Q.

What is the difference between the Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loan?

A.

With the Subsidized Stafford, the government pays the interest while you are in school. The interest on the Unsubsidized Stafford is not paid while you are in school, and you have the option of paying the interest or deferring it until after you graduate at which time it will be added to the principle of the loan.

Q.

If I have Stafford loans, how will they be disbursed?

A.

Stafford Loan proceeds will be credited electronically to your Student Account, reducing your balance due accordingly. If you are entitled to a refund (there is a credit balance on your account) a reimbursement will be issued to you either as a direct deposit or a paper check.

Q.

Who must complete a Loan Entrance Interview?

A.

New and transfer students who are first time borrowers at our school and who are applying for a Stafford Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loan must complete the interview.

Q.

Is consideration given to parents who are paying on a loan for two other children who have previously attended Guilford?

A.

No, there is not a specific allowance in the formula for loans for siblings who are no longer in college.

Q.

How much should I borrow so that I know I can afford to pay it back?

A.

Planning ahead is essential to managing debt. If you plan to borrow each year you are in school, estimate the total amount you will borrow. Then use a sample loan repayment calculator (Repayment tools and calculators to help with your student loan repayment) to determine how much you will have to pay each month (there are numerous web sources for these types of calculators). To decide how much to borrow, you can use the criteria lenders use when they consider and applicant’s ability to repay: the total monthly payment for all debts should not exceed 8% of your anticipated gross monthly salary.

Q.

What happens if I don’t pay back my loan?

A.

Not paying back your student loan can have serious consequences. If you go into default your lender can require you to repay the entire amount immediately, including all interest plus collection and late payment charges. The lender can sue you and can ask the federal government for help in collecting from you. The Internal Revenue Service may withhold your income tax refund and apply it toward your loan. You can not get any additional federal student aid until you make satisfactory arrangements to repay your loan. Also the lender will notify credit bureaus of your default. This will affect your credit rating, which will make it difficult to obtain credit cards, mortgages and/of loans.

Q.

If I borrow from more than one loan program, I may have to pay several different lenders at the same time. May I consolidate my payments?

A.

If you’ve borrowed from more than one type of loan program, you may be able to consolidate some of the loans and use one payment plan to repay the loans. In general, federal loans may be consolidated into one new loan at an interest rate of the weighted average of the original interest rates of the loans being consolidated. The length of the extension depends on the total amount of the loans consolidated. PLUS and Guilford College Loans are not eligible for consolidation.

Q.

When do I sign for my Perkins Loan?

A.

If you have been awarded a Perkins Loan, you must sign a Master Promissory note before registration. This note is mailed to your home address approximately 30 days before the Fall semester begins.

Q.

Where do I go to get my loan deferment form filled out?

A.

The Registrar’s Office, in the basement of New Garden Hall. You will need to print out an enrollment verification form and attach it to the deferment paperwork. You can do this by logging into Banner Web, select student & Financial aid, then select student records and then student enrollment verification. You will then need to enter the information and request what you need.

Q.

How do parents apply for a PLUS loan?

A.

The quickest way is to fill out a request form through the student’s Student Financial Services Counselor but they can also be applied for directly at a lender. You can see a listing of the lenders at Elm Resources http://www.elmselect.com/oll/Agreement.

Q.

What are alternative loans and when can they be used?

A.

An alternative loan is a last resort when all other forms of loan have been exhausted and can be used to pay any balance due on a student’s account up to the difference of the financial aid awarded and the student’s budget. You can also see a listing of the lenders that offer alternative loans at Elm Resources http://www.elmselect.com/oll/Agreement.

Q.

How do I apply for in-state residency?

A.

You must complete and submit to the Office of Student Financial Services a N.C. State Residency Questionnaire. This form is available in the Office of Student Financial Services and is required for all North Carolina residents whether or not they are receiving any NC taxpayer funded aid.

Q.

Am I eligible for a state scholarship at Guilford?

A.

If you qualify as a legal resident of the State of North Carolina and if you are enrolled full-time and do not have a bachelor’s degree you qualify for the NCLTG. In 2007-2008 the grant amounted to $975 per semester. It is not based on need. In addition, those NC residents who demonstrate financial need using the FAFSA may also receive funds from the NC Contractual Scholarship Fund as a part of their “package”. These awards range from $250-$7,500 based on need.