Academics

PPS Experience (PPSE) Minor

Mark Justad

The PPSE minor is an issues-based teaching and learning experience. It is designed for Guilford students to achieve a minor in Principled Problem Solving. Each PPSE minor is created by a faculty teaching team and includes an experiential learning component such as an internship, fieldwork, travel seminar, project or other non-traditional learning opportunities. The PPSE minor involves 3-4 semesters of course work in which students can achieve a total of 16-18 academic credit hours.

Learn

Take a PPS Class

FYS Cape Fear River Basin

Maia Dery

The Cape Fear River Basin Studies program is a unique, multi-course sequence of place-based courses offered through the Center for Principled Problem Solving at Guilford College. The courses in this program ask students to apply their developing minds and bodies to some of the contemporary and historical issues facing the Cape Fear River Basin while practicing and contributing to the College’s growing commitment to the application of its Core Values through Principled Problem Solving. Through a variety of field trips, lectures and outdoor experiences, students learn various ways to develop and facilitate their own intellectual passions.

FYS The Power of Place

Eva Lawrence

Years ago, Freud argued that our identity is “clearly and sharply outlined and delineated” from the outside world. Today, psychologists, biologists and environmental scientists understand that there is a much more interesting and complex relationship between our thoughts, behaviors, emotions and the places with which we interact. We will explore this person-place relationship in several different contexts, including indoor and natural places, optimal performance, addiction and virtual reality. Although some class sessions will involve a traditional lecture and discussion format, most of the sessions will be interactive and participatory. Specifically, we will utilize experiential learning that includes direct experiences, field trips, projects and reflections. Problem-based learning will also be a key component of this class. Students will work collaboratively to frame questions regarding problem cases, individually select readings, and then share what they have learned to help answer the questions.

Some Saturday field trips are required.
Students should participate in the pre-orientation Surf Camp (Cape Fear River Basin).

FYS Business Ethics: Making Profits, Doing Right

Betty Kane

As part of the experience of this course, students are required to live in a specific wing of one of our residence halls. If you have selected a roommate already, please make sure that person is interested in this FYS option, too. NOTE: This FYS 101 has required field trips.

The contemporary business environment presents many ethical challenges. The following questions provide examples: What role should businesses play in decisions about 11 million illegal immigrants and their role in the United States work force? How should laws and policies regarding workplace discrimination be applied in situations involving gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals? Should there be restrictions on the production and sales of food items containing, or affected by, genetically modified organisms (GMO’s)? How can businesses effectively assume environmental responsibilities, e.g. avoidance and responses regarding the release of coal ash into rivers and streams? How should the big business of football address issues about concussions and their long-term health effects? What are the ethical implications of the business strategies of Walmart and Costco? What role should businesses play in providing affordable health care to their employees? In this course, we will explore contemporary issues about business ethics from interdisciplinary perspectives drawn from business ethics, philosophy and economics. We will learn about Quaker capitalists, who operated both profitably and ethically, and study their model for economic success and their ultimate extinction. Consistent with their values of integrity and stewardship (two of the College’s core values), these Quakers charged a fair price and provided a quality product or service. Good stewards of their bounty, they reinvested their profits for the benefit of their employees, their communities and the world. We will examine how business decision-making involves finding a balance among the goals of profitability, sustainability and ethics in the workplace. This course will include field trips to local businesses that illustrate how to strike such a balance.

*There will be a two day and one night field trip associated with this course.

PPS 110 Intro to Civic Engagement

Explore the concept of civic engagement and survey the status of civic initiatives and social movements across the U.S. Seminar format, includes community engagement hours requirement and self-assessment of skills and expertise.

PPS 111 Civic Engagement Explorations

Further consideration of civic engagement and what is required of citizens in a healthy democracy. Seminar format, includes community engagement hours requirement. Prerequisite:  PPS 110 or instructor permission.

PPS 150 Cape Fear River Basin Studies Seminar

Maia Dery

The Cape Fear River Basin Studies program is a unique, multi-course sequence of place-based courses offered through the Center for Principled Problem Solving at Guilford College. The courses in this program ask students to apply their developing minds and bodies to some of the contemporary and historical issues facing the Cape Fear River Basin while practicing and contributing to the College’s growing commitment to the application of its Core Values through Principled Problem Solving. Through a variety of field trips, lectures and outdoor experiences, students learn various ways to develop and facilitate their own intellectual passions.

PPS 210 Practices and Narrative

Jennie Knight

The course explores the first and second tiers of the principled Problem Solving curriculum, PPS Foundations and PPS Practice. The first tier, Foundations, is brought into focus by examining critical and creative modes of thinking. Course readings that highlight these ways of thinking have been selected and class exercises and assignments challenge students to understand and practice them in new ways. The second tier of the PPS curriculum, Practice, is introduced through readings and case studies presented by Guilford faculty from several disciplines. This class is limited to students in the PPS Scholars Program.

PPS 211 Change Innovation Impact

Jennie Knight

This course explores principled problem solving through an extended examination of organizations and the individuals who make them work. The class will read materials that examine the nature of rganizations that seek social change and innovation using a variety of methods and resources. Particular attention will be given to studying what makes organizations effective in accomplishing social change, innovation and impact. In addition, the class will focus on issues and concerns related to ethics and/in leadership within the selected organizations and beyond. Students are required to undertake 50 hours of assigned fieldwork for this course. The class is limited to students in the PPS Scholars Program.

PPS 250 100 Ways to Change the World

Kim Yarbray

So you want to change the world? This class will get you into the community to explore how organizations and practitioners (including many Guilford alums) are addressing significant social and ethical concerns. You will develop a portfolio of understanding that will help you seek change in ways consistent both with your own values and the lens of principled problem solving. Focus issues for this class include sustainability, incarceration, education, and community building.

PPS 260 Independent Study

Mark Justad

May also be offered at 360 and 460 levels.

PPS 290 Internship

Delilah White

May also be offered at 390 level.

PPS 350 Investigations into Economic Class in America

Delilah White

This course provides a unique means of exploring the impact of economic class on oneself and society. As investigators using "hands-on" and experiential learning techniques, you will examine the hidden rules of society, the effect of normalization on social issues, define what constitutes stability in America, and build resources and skills that will empower you to build your own social capital and relationships of mutual respect. Satisfies the social justice/environmental responsibility requirement.

SPAN 202 Interim Conversation/Composition

Karen Spira

Thorough review of Spanish grammar as needed, intensive work on oral and written expression on a variety of topics and exposure to a wide range of cultural “texts” (from traditional literature to more recent media). Students cannot receive credit for both SPAN 202 and 212. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or instructor permission.

learn
/lurn/

verb

  1. gain knowledge of (something) or acquire skill in (some sort of practice) by study, instruction or experience

PPS Faculty Seminar

Jennie Knight

PPS Faculty Seminar is an opportunity for Guilford College faculty and staff to learn about “best practices” for community-engaged teaching, research and problem-solving. The seminar is designed for participants to acquire knowledge and skills that shape the cultivation or re-design of courses to include community-engaged teaching and learning components.

Seminar Objectives

In the PPS Faculty Seminar, you will:

  • Explore student learning outcomes for community-engaged learning
  • Learn best practices as voiced by community partner organizations and agencies
  • Engage ethical, philosophical and pedagogical issues involved in community-engaged teaching, research and problem-solving
  • Experience the local Greensboro community
  • Receive individualized support in developing community partnerships, community-engaged assignments and syllabi plans

Seminar Participants

All Guilford College faculty and staff teaching courses at Guilford are eligible to apply.

Seminar Offerings

  • Each participant will receive a stipend of up to $1,000. This includes $750 for completion of the seminar and an additional $250 after submitting a revised course plan or syllabus following the seminar.
  • The seminar meets for six (6) three-hour sessions over the course of two weeks during the early summer.
  • After completing the seminar, participants will receive individualized support from CPPS, the Bonner Center, the Office of Undergraduate Research, and the Internship Office in the Career Development Center (depending upon the nature of the course and project that is developed during the seminar).
  • The following academic year, seminar participants will meet monthly as a cohort for mutual networking, trouble-shooting, brainstorming and support.

Application Process

Write a letter of interest with a description of a course you would like to cultivate or re-design to implement community-engaged teaching, research, and/or problem-solving. Email the letter of interest to Dr. Jennie S. Knight, director of engaged teaching for the Center for Principled Problem Solving, .