Academics

Events

Sat Aug 30

Saturday Classes Begin

Mon Sep 01

All new course proposals for 2015 Summer, 2015 Fall Semester and 2016 Spring Semester Due

Mon Sep 01

Last Day to Add or Drop Regular/Intensive/First Half Semester/Saturday Classes Without a Grade

January Term

Descriptions

Internships/Service/Independent & Group Projects

  • Internships . 1-4 Credits. Graded. Career Development Center assists students with finding sponsors and appropriate opportunities. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Service Projects . 1-4 Credits. Credit/No credit. Contact James Shields in the Bonner Center. Cost TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Independent Projects . 1-4 Credits. Graded or Credit/No Credit. Faculty or staff sponsor required. Cost TBD. Board fee for those living on campus. 
  • Group Projects. 1-4 Credits. Graded or Credit/No Credit. Faculty or staff sponsor required. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Center for Principled Problem Solving. 1-4 Credits. Credit/No Credit. Mark Justad is the staff sponsor. Staff will support independent or group student projects. See Mark Justad for information. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.

On Campus Experiences & Seminars

  • 50001 ART 250 001 Investigating the Book – Cover to Cover – Inside and Out. Graded. 3 credits. Instructor: Mary Beth Boone.  Students will explore different types of surface designs including paste papers, uruauchi, and printing. In addition, we will also cover the history of sewn and adhesive book structures as well as how they are made, considering both traditional and innovative methods. This course will culminate with a collaborative project incorporating text, type, and imagery and will be printed on an antique letterpress. A field trip to the BookWorks studio in Asheville, NC will further expose students to the world of book arts. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee:  $125.
  • 50002 BIOL 250 001 Bloodstain Pattern Analysis. Graded. 2 credits. Instructor: Bryan Brendley. Bloodstain pattern analysis is a discipline that serves a significant role in answering the question of "what" happened at a crime scene. When properly applied, such analysis helps establish a timeline of specific events that are associated with violent crimes. Bloodstain pattern analysis is a very methodical process that has been vetted by scientific rigor since the 13th century and has been found robust in its ability to aid crime scene reconstruction. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50003 BIOL 250 002 Forensic Photography. Graded. 2 credits. Instructor: Frank Keegan.  This course explores the application of digital photographic techniques to forensic situations. Investigates procedures for photographing crime scenes, including overview and close-up photography. Provides instruction in composition, specialized lighting techniques, evidence preservation, and photographic record-keeping. Includes a survey of the history of photography. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. 
  • 50004 ENGL 250 001 The Binge. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor:  Heather Hayton.  This experiential course will explore the concept of "binging" as we consume multimedia-- in theory and practice. We will read several articles on binging from various disciplinary viewpoints, some of which say it is the "new normal" while others claim it is unhealthy. Additionally, we will create our own local binge experiments: we will binge-watch an entire TV series over 4 days, binge-read an entire book series over 4 days, and binge-play a video game over 2 days. As we do so, we will track our bodies' reactions and use the data to support or challenge claims about the attraction of binging on media. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50005 ENVS 350 001 Practicum in Sustainable Farming. Graded. 1 credit. Instructors: Marlene McCauley and Bronwyn Corry. Prerequisite: instructor permission. Hands-on experience in sustainable farming on the Guilford College Farm. Students will essentially become the farm's operating team, responsible for marketing, harvesting, maintenance, and crop weather protection. Requires experience, commitment, and attention to detail. Instructor's permission required to enroll. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50006 GST 150 001 Woodworking and Furniture History. Credit/No credit. 4 credits. Instructor: Jim Hood. The course introduces students to the basics of traditional woodworking and furniture making. We’ll begin this course by learning to identify different types of wood used for furniture, understanding basic wood technology, and the process of furniture making.
    Students will spend most of their time in the studio, learning the fundamentals of measurement, layout, and hand tool use, culminating in a small furniture project employing their skills. Through a variety of field trips, we’ll also explore the history and diversity of woodcraft throughout North Carolina. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $550.
  • 50007 GST 150 002 GRE Prep Course. 0 credits.  Instructor: Katherine Lambert-Scronce. Guilford College offers a no-credit preparation course for the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). This is the test most commonly used by graduate schools to evaluate applicants for admission. The GRE Prep course helps students become familiar with either the GRE® General Test, which measures verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, and analytical writing skills, or the GRE® Subject Tests, which are intended to gauge undergraduate achievement in one of eight specific fields of study. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50057 GST 150 003 GMAT Prep Course. 0 credits. Instructor: Bryan Thomas. Guilford College offers a preparation course for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), which is the test used by most graduate business schools and MBA programs to evaluate applicants for admission. The GMAT Prep course helps students become familiar with the three main parts of the exam, including the Analytical Writing Assessment, the Quantitative section, and the Verbal section. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50008 GST 250 001 Leadership Exploration. Graded. 2 credits. Instructors: Steven Moran, Emily Lott.  Students will explore their personal leadership styles and values. They will then learn how to effectively apply these, while working in a group setting to plan the annual Guilford College Student Leadership Conference. Students will have opportunity to shadow community leaders, learn leadership theory, and reflect on best practices while actively engaging with their peers! Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50009 GST 250 002 Data Visualization: An Introduction. Graded. 2 credits. Instructor: Rob Whitnell. The explosion of qualitative and quantitative data in almost every field has resulted in many different ways of visualizing data as a means of explanation or persuasion. This course provides a hands-on introduction to best practices in data visualization: graphs, diagrams, maps, models, animations, and others. You'll analyze effective and ineffective examples of visualization and create your own, often based on datasets that you choose. You should be comfortable with math at the level of the quantitative literacy requirement and have strong computer skills, including access to your own computer. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Hybrid online course.
  • 50010 GST 250 003 Practically Bicycling. Credit/No credit. 3 credits. Instructor: Vance Ricks. This project focuses on the ways in which bikes are used, and useful, in everyday life – both by individuals and by communities. We'll examine links between bicycling, urban planning, and equity, by learning about "invisible" cyclists; we'll learn how to do basic bicycle maintenance and repair; we'll try different kinds of riding (roads, trails, bikeways, stationary machines) under different conditions; and we'll meet members of local bicycling advocacy groups. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50011 GST 250 004 Improv Comedy and the Art of Interviewing. Credit/No credit. 3 credits. Instructor: Alan Mueller. Every job interview involves improvisation. Learn the rules, techniques and art of improvisational comedy while also practicing skills that transfer to effective interviews. Job interviews, much like improvisational comedy, take practice. It is difficult to remember all of the most effective interview techniques when faced with the pressure of speaking extemporaneously about your experience. Participating in practice interviews, improvisational comedy and guided reflection can assist in developing those crucial ‘thinking on your feet’ skills. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50050 GST 250 020 Peace Gives Us Meaning: Local and Literary Challenges to The War On Terror. Graded. 3 credits. Instructor: Matthew C. Armstrong. This course will focus on the way various narrative forms help us understand The Global War on Terror, with particular attention paid to the United States’ engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan. With attention to both fiction and non-fiction, this course will offer students a global perspective and opportunities to write from a broad range of narrative formats. The culmination of the course will be an experiential research project that examines a subculture of citizens in our community who have been impacted by the GWOT. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course fee:  $25 for local excursions.
  • 50013 GST 350 001 Science Education and Science Fairs. Credit/No credit. 3 credits. Instructor: David Hildreth. What makes a good science fair project and how can one teach K-12 children what is good science? In this course, students will learn how to facilitate the successful development of “true,” “age-appropriate,” science projects. Prior to and during J-term, students will work with public school teachers and children in the development and judging of science fair projects, culminating in the countywide science fair to be held at Guilford in January. This course is student-centered with flexibility regarding course topics and direction.
    Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50013 IDS 415 001 Understanding Eating Disorders: A Multicultural Perspective. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Anna Pennell. Prerequisites: Historical Perspectives, 88 credits. Fulfills IDS Requirement. The traditional understanding of eating disorders is based on the image of white, middle-class teenagers getting carried away in their quest to be thin. Recent research reveals the complexity of the development of eating disorders across racial, socio-economic, and gender lines. This course explores multiple perspectives on the prevention, development, and treatment of eating disorders. Students are required to bring the lens of their own particular academic discipline in order to contribute to classroom discourse. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50014 IDS 435 001 Understanding Poverty. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Edwins Gwako. Prerequisites: Historical Perspectives, 88 credits. Fulfills IDS Requirement. This course examines the causes, dynamics and ramifications of poverty in America and other cultures. Course provides opportunities for critical thinking and useful synthesis to deepen understanding of poverty and/or just catch up with the state of interdisciplinary knowledge, policies and remedial actions. Explores the cultural and structural factors contributing to poverty including the settings of family, neighborhoods, schools, communities, access to extra-familial opportunities and, individual level attributes. Each student is required to spend a minimum of 2 hours per day engaged in internship-site based experiential learning. Recommended sites include the Interactive Resource Center, Urban Ministries and, the African Services Coalition.
    Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. 
  • 50015 IDS 452 001 A Cultural History of Ancient Greece from Homer to the Death of Socrates. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Timothy Kircher. Prerequisites: Historical Perspectives, 88 credits. Fulfills IDS Requirement.  Students should arrive at a comprehension of how this society throughout its history retained these categories and reinterpreted them in context of fluctuating political fortunes. Thus one comes to see at the same time both the unity of Greek culture and its variegated development. The methods and materials for investigating this period are interdisciplinary, drawing on literary, legal, philosophical and historiographical sources. Students will benefit from developing expertise not only in dealing with interdisciplinary topics but also in their understanding of the nature of interdisciplinary learning: this is a hallmark of the Guilford education. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $25.
  • 50016 PECS 250 001 Exploring Buddhist Community: Meditation as Peace Practice in the Triad and Beyond. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Jeremy Rinker.  In this course, we will explore basic Buddhist Meditation practices that have spread across Asia and eventually come to North Carolina. The first week and a half of the course will consist of intense meditation, as well as, discussion-based reflection on our own spiritual and peace practices. The second half of the class will involve intensive study of Buddhist Peace community in the Piedmont-Triad area, focusing on a comparative study of Buddhism, its American manifestations, and the immigrant communities in which they are linked.  Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50017 PPS 250 001 100 Ways to Change the World. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Kim Yarbray. So you want to change the world? This class will get you into the community to explore how organizations and practitioners (including many Guilford alums) are addressing significant social and ethical concerns. You will develop a portfolio of understanding that will help you seek change in ways consistent both with your own values and the lens of principled problem solving. Focus issues for this class include sustainability, incarceration, education, and community building. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $180.
  • 50018 PPS 350 001 Investigations into Economic Class in America. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Delilah White. This course provides a unique means of exploring the impact of economic class on oneself and society. As investigators using "hands-on" and experiential learning techniques, you will examine the hidden rules of society, the effect of normalization on social issues, define what constitutes stability in America, and build resources and skills that will empower you to build your own social capital and relationships of mutual respect. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50019 REL 200 001 Native American Religions. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Mark Justad. This class examines Native American spiritual traditions as observed and expressed in Native American history, culture and practice. The class focuses primarily on the Dine´ (Navajo), Lakota (Sioux) and Ani'-Yun'-wiya (Cherokee) nations. Attention will be given to the interactions of Native nations with European and Euroamerican people and culture, to gender and gender diversity among Native nations, and to developing an appropriate lens for engaging Native cultures. The class includes two overnight trips, one to Washington DC and The National Museum of the American Indian and one to The Museum of the Cherokee Indian in Cherokee, NC. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Estimated course materials fee: $200. Fulfills the Humanities and Diversity in the US requirements.
  • 50020 REL 250 001 Imaging the Divine. Graded. 4 credits. Instructor: Jennie Knight. How do people imagine the unimaginable? In this course, we will explore how diverse mystical traditions in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism reconcile this paradox. Through a study of psychology of religion, site visits to local religious institutions, and guided artistic expression, students will explore their own imaging processes. We will also examine the renewed interest in Christian and Jewish mysticism among contemporary feminists’ drawing from ancient and medieval mystical depictions of the divine as feminine. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50021 THEA 250 001. January Term Theatre Production. Credit/No credit. 4 credits. Instructor: Jack Zerbe. Credits for graduation only. Does not fulfill theatre studies major requirements. Work in an ensemble as actors and technicians for theatre studies’ production of The Crucible. The 8-hour day is typically divided between technical work in the mornings and rehearsal or continued tech work in the afternoons. Includes Saturday afternoon rehearsal. Simply enroll. No audition required. Parts go to the first 10 women/10 men. Extra spaces for technicians. Required attendance at November casting session. Tech 1/24-25. Dress 1/26-29 evenings. Performances: 1/30 -1/31, 2/5-7. Final written reflection required. 
    Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $50 to purchase the approved script and stage makeup.

Seminars & Group Projects - Off Campus

Coming Soon

Study Away (Domestic)

  • 50022 BIOL 250 003 Wolves and Northwoods Carnivores: Predatory Ecology. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Northwoods, Ely and the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota. No Guilford faculty presence. The Audubon Center of the Northwoods sponsors this project that covers a broad range of topics related to wildlife with a focus on the gray wolf, lynx and the white-tailed deer, and other predators, plus many of the animals directly or indirectly associated with or affected by these predators as prey. The course is field-oriented and includes opportunities for back country travel, wildlife observation and tracking, as well as an introduction to habitats, how wildlife respond to natural and artificial disturbance, and human factors. Cost: $1725 plus travel to/from the site and transcript fee. $100 deposit required. Tentative Dates: January 1-17, 2015. Special winter wear required.
  • 50023 GST 250 005 Ghost Ranch Experience. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Abiquiu, New Mexico. Austin College faculty onsite. Journey to this famous education and retreat center near Sante Fe, New Mexico, with its unique combination of natural beauty, paleontology, geology, archaeology, history and art. Students select their top choice and two backups from a range of class options: Silversmithing (add a $200 materials fee), Weaving, Pottery, Holistic Medicine, Sustainability Practices, Spiritual/Religious Communities of Northern New Mexico. Experience wide-open spaces, starry skies, mountains, mesas and red rock formations in the multicultural nature and stunning landscape of a 21,000-acre working ranch, a rustic setting renowned for creativity and self-exploration. Cost: $2200 plus travel. Non-refundable $250 deposit required. Tentative Dates: January 2-24.
  • 50024 REL 250 002 Ending Hunger in North Carolina. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Guilford College, NC and Washington D.C. Guilford Faculty leader: Frank Massey. Students will spend four days in eastern NC building a house and talking with residents about rural poverty and hunger issues. We will then return to Guilford College to learn about, and research issues related to, hunger in the Triad. Participants will spend the last week in DC learning to lobby and advocate for issues from Friends Committee on National Legislation. Finally all students will visit Congressional offices advocating ending hunger and reducing poverty. Participants will present a program to their peers during the spring semester. Estimated cost: $1850, and housing/meals according to policies. Tentative Dates: January 2-25.

Study Abroad (International)

Asia

  • 50053 BUS 250 001 India: An Examination of Globalization. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Various cities, India. Faculty leaders: two faculty members from Elmhurst College (both in business and economics) in cooperation with the Upper Midwest Association of Intercultural Education. The course will expose students to the current business climate in India with particular emphasis on the activities of American and other Western multinational firms. Professors from Madras Christian College and local business leaders will explain India’s culture and practices. This experience includes visits to both governmental offices and businesses which have an impact on globalization within India. In addition, students will have the opportunity to interact with local students as well as explore a variety of cultural sites. Estimated cost: $5,475-$5,775. Includes: transportation, hotel accommodations in twin and triple rooms, continental breakfast daily, sixteen lunches and sixteen dinners.
  • 50056 ENVS 250 002 Vietnam: Airs, Oceans, and Land—The Physics of Climate Change. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Various cities, Vietnam. Faculty leaders: two faculty members from St. Catherine University (one in math/physics, one in chemistry/biochemistry) in cooperation with the Upper Midwest Association of Intercultural Education. This course considers that changes in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans provide a symbiotic approach to modeling climate change for the planet. Variables such as droughts and floods enable us to model and predict long term conditions that affect and are affected by the evolving atmosphere and ocean as well as the carbon cycle. Students will explore these variables as they travel throughout Vietnam, observing and recording as they discover, and model their impact on the overall climate change as the course progresses. Estimated cost: $6,675-$6,975. Includes: transportation, hotel accommodations in twin and triple rooms, continental breakfast daily, seven lunches and one dinner.
  • 50030 GST 250 006 Bali: Religion, Healing Arts, and the Environment.  Graded. 4 credits. Location: Bedulu, Bali and Yogyakarta, Java, Austin College faculty leader: Dr. Ivette Vargas-O’Bryan. This immersion program will expose students to the dynamic relationships between religion, healing and the environment in the local traditions of Bali. . The course will explore how environmental concerns are inter-woven with ritual and traditional healing by engaging students in the history of Javanese and Bali-nese culture including the practices of medical and local healers, artists and conservation experts. This course will immerse students in Balinese culture through homestays and hands-on activities such as practicing yoga, local healing traditions, conservation engagement, and field-methods training. Estimated cost: $4,500-5,100 including airfare and some meals. Non-refundable $250 deposit required.
  • 50031 GST 250 007 India: Lessons in Sustainable Living. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Mumbai, India. Guilford faculty leader: Lavon Williams. Students will examine the relationship between lifestyle and sustainability in Western India while living in a rice farming village, visiting tribal forest dwellers and comparing the agrarian lifestyle with growing industrial towns. Immersing themselves in the local culture and participating in the daily life of a residential, tribal high school for 11 days, students will reflect upon the positive and negative impact of different lifestyles and consider how the lessons learned may be taken home to the USA for sustainable living in the 21st century. Estimated cost: $2,581 plus airfare. Includes food and lodging.
  • 50044 HIST 250 001 China: Taiwan and Hong Kong - Changing Identities. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Hong Kong and Taiwan. Guilford faculty leader: Zhihong Chen. The Chinese experience of modernity is inextricably linked to foreign colonialism and the treaty-ports’ encounter with Western cultural traditions and capitalism. Situated on the southeastern edge of the traditional Chinese empire, Taiwan and Hong Kong represent two distinct paths during the transformation from tradition to modernity. Through intensive reading and writing as well as extensive onsite fieldwork, this course explores the complicated and uncertain relationship between colonialism and modernity, and the multi-layered, changing identities in Taiwan and Hong Kong from the 19th century until today. Estimated cost: $4,335, plus airfare. Fulfills intercultural requirement. 

Europe

  • 50054 BUS 250 002/50055 ECON 250 001 UK: From Factories to Finance – The Rise of the Global Economy. Graded. 4 credits. Location: London, Manchester, Birmingham, Blaenavon, United Kingdom. Faculty leaders: two faculty members from Augustana College (one in history, one in business administration) in cooperation with the Upper Midwest Association of Intercultural Education. This course examines Britain’s role in the creation of a global economy. Since the eighteenth century, Britain has been at the forefront of 1) industrialization, 2) global trade, and 3) the emergence of financial markets. We will examine both historical sites and current manifestations of these institutions, from the textile mills of the Midlands, to the shipyards of Liverpool, to the London financial districts. In this class, students will understand the modern global economy through the contextual lens of Britain’s history of industrialization and social change. Estimated cost: $5,105-$5,405. Includes: transportation, hotel accommodations in twin and triple rooms, continental breakfast daily, one lunch, five dinners and two cultural performances.
  • 50027 ENGL 250 002 UK: Oxford Fantasy Writers. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Oxford, United Kingdom. Guilford faculty leader: Caroline McAlister. Students will explore the relationship between place and imagination in the writings of the four British fantasists, Lewis Carroll, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R.Tolkien, and Philip Pullman. These writers all spent most of their adult lives living and working in Oxford. While their fictional works are set in alternate fantastical worlds, they all found their inspiration in the physical reality of Oxford's libraries, living quarters, churches, pubs, and parks. Students will visit sites frequented by the authors and sites referenced in their works and compose journals reflecting on those visits. Estimated cost: $3,797 plus airfare. Meals not included. Prerequisites: ENGL 102, 3.0 GPA. Fulfills humanities requirement.
  • 50028 ENVS 250 001 Netherlands: International Environmental Law.  Graded. 4 credits. Location: Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. This course examines the role of international law in protecting the environment. It takes a fundamental approach meaning the examination of environmental law from the perspective of principles, environmental rights, and the choice and design of regulatory instruments. Global climate change will serve as the main case study for this course, but will also focus on the European Union as a regional international organization as well. Students are also taken on cultural excursions to important institutions that will deepen an understanding of the topic. Requires the submission of final work after the completion of the January term. Estimated cost: $4,625-$4,718 depending on housing choice and exchange rates. Airfare and food not included. January 3-January 24. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA.
  • 50029 GERM 350 001 Germany: Alp Dreams - Winter Trails and Mountain Tales.  Graded. 4 credits. Location: Munich, Germany. Guilford faculty leader: David Limburg. Students will begin this course on the slopes of an Austrian ski resort for a three-day alpine experience. Following this excursion, we will be based in Munich for the remainder of the course. During the day, students will explore a variety of Bavarian winter trails in Southern Germany while in the evening, students will learn about the mountain tales of the Brothers Grimm and other German, Austrian, and Swiss authors, as well as film influenced by these folktales. Estimated costs: $2,551. Fulfills humanities requirement. Start:  Sunday, December 28; end:  Friday, January 16. Returns to USA Saturday, January 17.
  • 50035 GST 250 011 Italy: Italian Language Intensive. Graded. 3 credits. Location: Siena, Italy. Faculty coordinator: Jack Zerbe. Students take intensive Italian language classes 3.5 hours each morning, Monday through Friday, at La Scuola Leonardo da Vinci. La Scuola is located in the center of Tuscany’s historic old Siena, a short walk from the famous Piazza del Campo. In addition to taking language class, students propose and complete a 10-15 page research paper on a subject readily accessible in Siena or nearby Florence. Students will live in the home of an Italian family, who provides traditional Italian breakfast and dinner. Estimated cost: $1,680-$1,780 plus airfare. Includes most breakfasts and dinners. January 5-24.
  • 50052 GST 250 022 Italy, Greece, and Turkey – Cultural Exploration. Graded. 3 Credits. Location: Various cities in Italy, Greece, and Turkey. No Guilford faculty presence. IAU College (Institute for American Universities) and CIS Abroad partner for this two week cultural exploration of Italy, Greece and Turkey. Over the course of this program, students will visit various locations, using the cities as their classroom and exploring the birthplace of western civilization. Leading experts in fields of art history, archeology, and philosophy will lead lectures and students will have the opportunity to engage in various cultural activities to reinforce their experience. Estimated cost to be announced, airfare not included. January 2-18. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA.
  • 50036 GST 250 012 France, Spain, Morocco, and Turkey – Cultural Exploration. Graded. 3 credits. Location: Various locations in Spain, France, Morocco, and Turkey. No Guilford faculty presence. This multi-country cultural exploration is sponsored by CIS Abroad and hosted by IAU College (Institute for American Universities). Dr. Carl Jurban, the president of IAU, travels with you throughout a three-week study trip. Experience everything from the markets of Morocco to the museums of Madrid with guest lectures by leading experts in the field. Particular attention will be paid to the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications. Estimated cost to be announced. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA. Tentative dates: Dec. 29-Jan. 18. $200 deposit required.
  • 50037 GST 250 013 France: French Language and Culinary Arts. Graded. 3 credits. Location: Paris, Cahors, Loire Valley, and Dordogne River Valley, France. No Guilford faculty presence. Based in Paris and the Loire Valley region of France, this one-of-a-kind gastronomic experience fuses formal French language study with hands-on culinary adventures that are sure to delight your taste buds. Forage for mushrooms, truffles and greens in the French countryside and learn how to infuse them into a cassoulet or Coq au Vin. Master the art of the soufflé rise. Explore artisanal practices related to olive oil pressing, cheese making and French baking. Cost: $7,200. Dates: January 2-25. $1,000 deposit required.
  • 50051 GST 250 021 Spain: Spanish Civilization and Culture. Graded. 3 credits. Location: Barcelona, Spain. No Guilford faculty presence. Based in the Barcelona International College, this CIS Abroad course covers main events within Spanish history and their influence on contemporary Spanish life. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the major areas of Spanish life and how they have changed in the last century in order to understand the current political, economic, and cultural situation within Spain. Cultural excursions and discussion of contemporary Spanish issues will give students cross-cultural perspectives that they can bring back to their home country. Estimated cost: $3,950 plus airfare. Dates: January 2-20. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA. 
  • 50046 PSCI 250 001 Netherlands: International Relations and Politics in the EU. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. Coverage of the key political and economic policies of the European Union with analysis of the different approaches to regional integration throughout the history of the EU. Analyzes the historical, political and economic bases for the rise of the EU as well as human rights cases with a comparison between the European and UN-framework. Students are also taken on excursions to important institutions that will deepen an understanding of the EU and its political and legal processes including Brussels, The Hague, and Amsterdam. Requires the submission of final work after the completion of the January term. Costs:  $3,659-$3,754, depending on housing choice and exchange rates. Airfare and food not included. January 3-January 24. Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA.
  • 50047 PSY 250 001 Netherlands: Positive Psychology. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. Students will become acquainted with the field of positive psychology, gaining insight in different theories, scientific findings, experiments and measurement tools. The results of positive psychology lead to the creation of real-world interventions that can improve school, businesses, governments, and aspects of individual life. Throughout workshops and interactive meetings, students will be provided with tools to evaluate and design research in this applied science. During two weekends, CES staff takes students around different European cities for cultural excursions and activities. Requires the submission of final work after the completion of the January term. Estimated cost: $4,625-$4,718 depending on housing choice and exchange rates. Airfare and food not included. January 3-January 24. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA.
  • 50048 SPAN 250 001 Spain: The Legacy of Spain’s Multicultural Formation. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Seville, Spain. No Guilford faculty presence. Experience Spanish culture today while studying the Spanish language and learning about the cultures that thrived in Spain during the Middle Ages and form the basis of the modern nation where you will live for a few weeks. Students will study Spanish at the intermediate level or above and will explore the legacy of the Romans, Christians, Jews and Muslims by visiting World Heritage sites such as the Mezquita in Cordoba, the Alhambra in Granada and the impressive cathedral of Seville. Costs include room and board in a family, language course, culture lectures, and trips to Ronda, Cordoba and Granada as well as sites in and near Seville. Estimated cost: $4,100 plus airfare. Dates: January 3-24. $300 non-refundable deposit required. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or 112.
  • 50049 THEA 250 002 Ireland: Actor Training Intensive at the Gaiety School of Acting. Graded. 3 credits. Location: Dublin, Ireland. No Guilford faculty presence. IES Abroad sponsors this conservatory-style training at the Gaiety School of Acting. This intensive is open to students at all levels of training and consists of practical rehearsal workshops, supplemented by elements of voice, movement and improvisation. Students read the plays of Beckett, Friel, O’Casey and Synge and rehearse scenes for a final presentation. Includes visits to other cultural attractions, such as the James Joyce Museum, the National Museum of Ireland, and the Book of Kells in the historic library of Trinity College Dublin. Estimated cost: $3,215 plus airfare. Meals not included. Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA. Dates: January 2-24. $500 deposit required.

Latin America

  • 50025 BIOL 151 001/50026 BIOL 151 002 Galapagos Islands: Evolution – A Historical Perspective. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Quito, Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands. Guilford faculty leader: Michele Malotky. This course begins with a two-week excursion to the Galapagos Islands to study the environs where Darwin’s theory of evolution emerged. Referring to historical texts and documents, students will emulate the early naturalists’ approach to data collection, keeping a field notebook of their observations. Upon return to campus, students will be introduced to methods used to examine species relationships through DNA analysis. In the spring semester, students will continue the construction of an Evolution “time-travel” portfolio, fulfilling requirements for historical perspectives, but a section is available for those simply seeking biology credit. Estimated cost: $5,059, plus airfare. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. Pending approval for the historical perspectives requirement.
  • 50039 GST 250 015 Caribbean Sailing and Leadership. Graded. 2 Credits. Location: Various Islands within the Caribbean. No Guilford faculty presence. This course puts students at the helm of an intense leadership program while exploring the beauty of the Caribbean. Learn basic seamanship, navigation and more as you sail 500 nautical miles, past 15 Caribbean islands. In addition, students will learn and practice theories of risk management, effective leadership, group dynamics, problem solving and decision-making. A large portion of the program lies in the hands of the students themselves. Each student leads a segment, plans passages, maintains a budget, and guides discussion. Estimated cost: $5,680 plus airfare. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA. Dates: January 2-25. $1,000 deposit required.
  • 50040 GST 250 016 Caribbean Tropical Marine Biology. Graded. 3 Credits. Location: Various Islands within the Caribbean. No Guilford faculty presence. This Broadreach College program is an eye-opening exploration of the biology and ecology of marine communities. Living aboard a 45-foot yacht and hopping from one diverse island to another, gives students the freedom and flexibility to discover the unparalleled diversity of ecosystems found in this tropical region of the world. Learn under the guidance of professional marine biologists. Tackle marine conservation. Understand the biochemical nature of marine environments. Learning is always active, experiential and enlightening — never boring. Estimated cost: $5,880 plus airfare. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA. Dates: January 2-25. $1,000 deposit required.
  • 50038 GST 250 014 Chile: Clinical Observation and the Cultural Aspects of Health Care. Graded. 3 Credits. Location: Santiago, Chile. No Guilford faculty presence. This project offers the opportunity for students to learn about health care policy and delivery systems in the context of Chile’s community-centered health care system. An important component of the program introduces students to historical, social, and cultural aspects of health care specific to Chile, including the treatment of illness and patients’ rights. The project is one course divided into two components: Clinical Observation and Intensive Spanish, designed for students who do not have any previous training in Spanish. Estimated cost: $2,915 plus airfare. Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA. Dates: January 4-23. $500 deposit required.
  • 50041 GST 250 017 Costa Rica: Veterinary Medicine. Graded. 3 Credits. Location: Quesada and Sarapiqui, Costa Rica,. No Guilford faculty presence. In Costa Rica, each day blends academics, lab practice and field work. Learn to draw blood, administer anesthesia and perform diagnostic tests. Assist with local spay/neuter programs. Attend lectures on topics such as anatomy, immunology, diagnostics, pathology and animal nutrition. Gain hands-on experience in veterinary clinics and hone your suturing skills on live animals that need your help. Estimated cost: $5,580 plus airfare. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA. Dates: January 2-25. $1,000 deposit required.
  • 50042 GST 250 018 El Salvador Service Project. 3 credits. Credit/No Credit. Locations: San Salvador and El Roble, El Salvador. Faculty coordinator: Daniel Diaz. Join a service learning project to rebuild a village school in El Salvador, executed in partnership with Companion Community Development Alternatives Ltd. (CoCoDA) and DePauw University. Under the direction of Ivan Villasboa, executive director of CoCoDA, students begin with an orientation in the capital, San Salvador, and then move to the countryside village of El Roble, where they gain a broad understanding of El Salvador’s history, culture, challenges, and potential. Students meet local officials, government representatives, business leaders, and interview former political prisoners that were tortured during the Salvadoran civil war. You will also connect with a Salvadoran comunidad as you live and work alongside local families out in the fields. Change the way you see the world—and how you see yourself. Spanish language skills recommended, but not required. Estimated cost: $1650 (including food), plus airfare and $10 airport entry fee.
  • 50045 IDS 450 001 Costa Rica: Surfing Centuries. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Nosara, Costa Rica, Guilford faculty leader: Maia Dery. Legendary surfer Dorian Paskowitz said, “Surfing re-creates you. “ So does your education. This course will give you an opportunity to learn to surf; we’ll use a collection of primary sources and academic research as lenses for viewing many problematic histories and contemporary challenges while also reflecting on your education. Indigenous culture, colonialism, segregation, technological history, gender and race relations, and sustainability are just a few of the concepts we’ll wrestle with as we immerse our minds and bodies in this challenging experience. Estimated cost: $3,260 plus airfare. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA, historical perspectives, 88 credits. Fulfills IDS requirement.

The Middle East

  • 50043 GST 250 019 Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Understanding Competing Narratives. Graded. 4 credits. Location: Ramallah, Ibillin, Jerusalem - Israel/Palestine. Guilford faculty leaders: Max Carter and Jonathan Malino. This three-week experience explores the religious, historical, political, and social narratives of Israelis and Palestinians. Students examine the conflict through the lenses of direct experience and those personally involved on both sides, especially individuals actively engaged in work toward a just peace. This project helps students develop an understanding of the complexity of a conflict in which there are at least two narratives that are both true – but don’t meet. Estimated cost: $2,886 plus airfare. Fulfills intercultural requirement .
019.JPG

How do I do a January Term?

Internship

  • Find a faculty sponsor from the academic department in which you want to do an internship. Talk to the Internship Coordinator if you need guidance on how to secure the right sponsor.
  • Work with your faculty sponsor and the Career Development Center to find an internship site suited to your goals.
  • Utilize a counselor in the Center to develop your resume and a cover letter for an application.
  • Determine how many credits the internship will be (1-4), listed as either DEPT 290 or 390.
  • Complete internship paperwork through the Career Development Center and submit to registrar’s office.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact: Internship Coordinator at 336.316.2187

Service Project

  • Determine if one of the College’s ongoing service projects is a good fit. If not, discuss your own ideas with James Shields in the Bonner Center.
  • If you want credit from a particular department for your project, get a sponsor from that department, secure the department chair’s approval, (and a representative from Early College, if you’re a student in ECG). If general studies credit is acceptable, ask James Shields to be your sponsor.
  • Determine # of credits for the project (1-4).
  • Fill out the independent project form available in the registrar’s office at New Garden Hall.
  • Submit to registrar during the registration period.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact:  James Shields at 336.316.2447

Independent or Group Project

  • Brainstorm with a faculty sponsor or mentor to develop your project idea.
  • Secure a faculty sponsor or mentor and flesh out the details and timing of your project.
  • Secure the sponsor or mentor’s formal approval for your project.
  • Fill out an independent project form (also available in the registrar’s office at New Garden Hall), and obtain both the sponsor/mentor’s and department chair’s signed approval.
  • Submit to the registrar’s office in New Garden Hall during advertised registration period.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact:   your academic advisor

Seminar

  • Consider how different experiences on the list will enrich your academic profile and personal development.
  • Pick from the list of existing experiences.
  • If you want a seminar to count towards your major, choose a graded experience.
  • Go to Banner and register for one experience. Refer to the calendar for registration dates.
  • Apply for January term housing and pick a meal plan in Banner Web if you will be on campus at any time.
  • Purchase required course materials before the start of the January term.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact:  the instructor of the seminar

Study Away (Domestic)

  • For all domestic experiences not led by a Guilford faculty or staff member, there is a two-stage application that starts at studyabroad.guilford.edu. Click “programs” and do a simple search for “January term.” Stage 1 applications are due on or before September 26.
  • Students applying to partner programs make a direct application to the off-campus partner once accepted by Guilford’s study abroad staff. Stage 2 applications are due on or before October 10.
  • An enrollment fee of $150 is billed to students upon acceptance by study abroad. It becomes non-refundable at the end of October. Some partners will also require a deposit, which students pay directly to that partner.
  • For Ghost Ranch experiences pick your top three choices. First choice is not guaranteed.
  • Deadlines are early. See calendar on the inside back page.
  • Refund policies vary from program to program.

Contact:  Study Abroad staff in King Hall 107 or 112

Study Abroad (International)

  • Experiences led by a Guilford College faculty/staff member require a one-stage application. For experiences organized and run by an independent off-campus partner, a two-stage application is required. See study abroad.guilford.edu. Click “programs” and do a simple search for “January term.” Stage 1 applications are due on or before September 26.
  • Students applying to partner programs make a direct application to the off-campus partner once accepted by Guilford’s study abroad staff. Stage 2 applications are due on or before October 10.
  • An enrollment fee of $150 is billed to students upon acceptance by study abroad. It becomes non-refundable at the end of October. Some partners will also require a deposit, which students pay directly to that partner.
  • Refund policies vary from program to program with a short window for withdrawal and severe penalties.
  • For experiences that include on campus instruction, see housing/board policy.
  • All students on study abroad experiences are required to attend and pass the study abroad orientation—a 1-credit graded course run on Sundays from October 26-November 23 at 12:30-3pm. A make-up session is available during the week for those with a conflict. If the orientation class puts you above 18 credits, you will not be charged an extra fee.
Contact:  Study Abroad staff in King Hall 107 or 112

Overview

Q.

What is January term?

A.

The January Term immerses students and faculty in intensive educational experiences that are deliberately innovative and experiential with the explicit goals of encouraging self-motivated independent learning and the ability to understand issues and concepts in action.

Q.

How many credits can I earn?

A.

Students earn 1-4 credits with the following approximate workload expectations for total time spent per week (including homework): 1 credit = 15 hours, 2 credits = 30 hours, 3 credits = 45 hours, 4 credits = 60 hours. All credits count toward the 128 required for graduation, but only graded experiences may count towards a major, minor, or general education requirement.

Q.

What kind of experiences are included?

A.

Internships, Service Learning, Independent Projects, Group Projects, Seminars, and Study Away.

Q.

What about the cost?

A.


All experiences other than study abroad/away will cost $500; this is a flat fee regardless of the number of credits. Students participating in a one credit experience and who apply for a January Term Grant will receive a grant award. For on campus room and board policies and fees, see the housing and food section. Study away experiences (domestic and international) incur fees as specified in the experience descriptions.

Q.

What about housing and food costs?

A.

Traditional students who already live on campus and participate in an experience that takes place on campus for any time, are required to live in their semester housing without an additional housing fee, but must purchase one of several meal plan options. Those meals plans are: 60 meals for $370; 52 meals for $330; 42 meals for $270; 30 meals for $200; 15 meals for $95 (available only to those on campus for 11 days or less). Residence halls are open only to J term participants. Students will not receive campus housing for January Term only.

Q.

What about study abroad/away costs?

A.

Prices for study abroad/away typically include the academic and residential dimensions of the experience—some include meals, some do not. Most do not include airfare, but some do. Consult with the study abroad staff for specifics. If you are on the Guilford campus for 11 days or less, you will be required to purchase at least the 15 meal block plan. Once accepted into a study away/abroad experience, students are charged a $150 enrollment fee, which becomes non-refundable at the end of October. Some study away/abroad experience partners will also ask for a deposit, which the student pays directly to the partner.

Q.

What is the course materials fee?

A.

These fees cover costs for special equipment, speakers, and local travel required by certain on campus experiences. All fees are posted in the course description or Banner footnotes.

Q.

What about financial aid?

A.

Students cannot use their semester financial aid to defray costs, but may apply for special grants that will help pay for the experience. See “January Term Grants” section. Students participating in a one credit experience and who apply for a January Term Grant will receive a grant award.

Q.

What is the policy on costs refunds?

A.

Refund policies vary from experience to experience with a short window for withdrawal that often closes long before the start of the experience. Students who withdraw after that period will be charged from between 25% -100% of the cost. For refund schedules of study away/abroad, see the study abroad web site and partner web sites. On campus experience costs are fully refundable until the last day to drop without a grade.

Q.

What about Early College?

A.

Early College students at Guilford have the option to participate in January Term opportunities, with the decision concerning participation and payment of tuition/fees made by students and parent/guardians. Families/students who choose to participate will work directly with Guilford College to register for January Term. Any credits earned during the January Term will be included on the respective student’s Guilford College transcript, not the Early College at Guilford high school transcript.

Q.

What if I am not a Guilford student?

A.

Participation is open to anyone who applies to become and is accepted as a visiting student. Send a completed visiting student application to the registrar. Priority is given to current students.

Q.

How do deposits work?

A.

There are no deposits required for on campus experiences. However, study away (international and domestic) both require a deposit at the time of application. See descriptions for amounts. Deposits become non-refundable upon acceptance to the program and are payable to Guilford College by check or credit card. The amount of the deposit is credited to the final bill.

Q.

What is a January term grant?

A.

It is a modest amount of money granted as a tuition discount at an average range of 10-15%, for which students must apply. Awards are competitive, limited, and based on demonstrated need. Students participating in a one credit experience and who apply for a January Term Grant will receive a grant award. Applications available online at the January term web site. Completed applications must be e-mailed to Jeff Favolise (favoliseje@guilford.edu) by the last day before Fall break.