Academics

Events

Thu Apr 24

Guilford College Theatre Presents "Heartbreak House"

Thru: Saturday, April 26, 20148:00 PM - 10:00 PMSternberger Auditorium, Founders Hall Visit this linkRead More
Wed Apr 30

Reception for Retiring and Departing Faculty

1:30 PM - 3:00 PMCarnegie Room, Hege LibraryRead More
Fri May 02

Last Day to Request a Provisional “X” Grade for Regular/Intensive/Second Half of Semester/Saturday Classes

January Term

Descriptions

Internships/Service/Independent & Group Projects

  • Internships . 1-4 Credits. Graded. Career Development Center assists students with finding sponsors and appropriate opportunities. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Service Projects . 1-4 Credits. Credit/No credit. Contact James Shields in the Bonner Center. Cost TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Independent Projects . 1-4 Credits. Graded or Credit/No Credit. Faculty or staff sponsor required. Cost TBD. Board fee for those living on campus. 
  • Group Projects. 1-4 Credits. Graded or Credit/No Credit. Faculty or staff sponsor required. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Center for Principled Problem Solving. 1-4 Credits. Credit/No Credit. Mark Justad is the staff sponsor. Staff will support independent or group student projects. See Mark Justad for information. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.

On Campus Experiences & Seminars

  • 50029 BIOL 250 002 Drowning Forensics.  2 credits. Graded. TWR. 6:30pm-9:00pm. Instructor: Bryan Brendley.  Over 3000 drowning deaths occur each year in the US. Drowning deaths are simply under-investigated due to the fact that so many are accidental. In addition, most investigators do not have the skills necessary to look for important forensic evidence in boats, on jet skis, or on buoys, rocks, and piers. This class will help students understand how to interpret evidence within the context of a fluid scene. Students will be presented with numerous case studies to help them learn how to determine if a drowning is accidental, homicidal, or undetermined. This experience will also delve into the controversial murder investigation known as the Smiley Face Killers  in order to discuss the possibility of a serial killer(s) who operated across state lines and could have drowned over 40 victims. This course will only count toward credits for graduation and NOT toward a major or minor. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50028 ENGL 250 002 Publishing Boot Camp. 2 credits. Graded. MTWR. 6:00pm-8:00pm. Instructor: Martin Arnold. Want to be a writer but don’t know what to do with that pile of poems or short stories on your desk? Publishing Boot Camp offers a literary community as a means of improving your work, resources for accessing the publishing world, and advice about how to successfully publish your writing. The final project will involve both a public reading and the production of a chapbook. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50030 ENGL 250 003 Introduction to Bookmaking: History and Craft. 2 credits. Graded, MTRF. 9:00am-12:00pm. Instructor: Andrew Saulter.  This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of book design and manual production techniques. Students will engage in an overview of book history in order to develop the context of books in the present. Hands-on projects will encourage students to consider all aspects of a final product as being the outcome of informed choice. The course will culminate with students each constructing a book of his or her own design. Costs: $500 plus $100 course fee, and housing/meals according to policies. Required tools and materials to be purchased by instructor for each student.
  • 50032 GST 110 001 Quantitative Literacy. 2 credits. Credit/No Credit. MTWRF. 9:00am-12:00pm.  This course covers quantitative reasoning and provides a general overview of quantitative methods, applied arithmetic, geometry and graphics, and algebra. Enrollment is limited to students who have not satisfied the quantitative literacy requirement. CR/NC. Fulfills quantitative literacy requirement. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50031 GST 150 001 Woodworking and Furniture History. 3 credits. Credit/No Credit. MTWRF. 9:30am-12:30pm. Instructor: Jim Hood. The course introduces students to the basics of traditional American woodworking and furniture making.  Starting with the tree in the forest, we’ll learn to identify the primary types of wood used for furniture in this area, to understand some basic wood technology, and we’ll follow the furniture making process through design, basic joinery, assembly, sanding, and finishing.  Through field trips to Old Salem, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the Thomas Day Museum, and local Piedmont furniture makers, we’ll explore the history and variety of woodcraft in central North Carolina.  Students will spend most of their time in the studio, learning the fundamentals of measurement, layout, and hand tool use, and they will complete a small furniture project by employing their skills.  Students will also do a research presentation on a traditional American furniture style or maker/firm. Costs: $500 plus $334 course fee, and housing/meals according to policies. Course fee covers tools and materials (to be purchased by instructor for each student) and field experiences.
  • 50035 GST 150 002 Immigrant and Refugee communities in Greensboro. 1 credit. Credit/No Credit. MWF. TBA. Instructor: Andrew Young. Greensboro is a unique city in our diversity and cultural richness. Our neighbors are Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian, Montagnard, Ghanaian, Nigerian, Latino, Liberian, Sierra Leonian, Korean, Indian, Pakistani, Hispanic, Somalis, Rwandans, Sudanese, Bosnians, and Hmong. Interact with students from all over the world and make a difference in their lives. Visit churches, temples, mosques generated by newcomers. Enjoy new businesses, stores, and restaurants.  Explore the human service systems that are available to newcomers. Use your experience to reflect upon ways to resolve disparities, embrace tolerance for differences, and create lasting, beneficial and sustainable practices aimed to improve the quality of life for Newcomers.  Related subjects of concern and interest include health care, education, employment, equality, sustainable lifestyle, discrimination, undocumented youth, and cultural expression. A crash course in cultural immersion to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities and distinctions related to social justice and diversity within the Immigrant and Refugee communities in Greensboro. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50041 GST 150 003 Refugee Education Connection. 1 credit. Graded.  MTW. 3:00pm-7:00pm. Instructor: Andrew Young. Refugee Education Connection explains how students can serve as cultural and information bridges to refugee and immigrant families who often do not understand the American higher education experience yet want their children to have access to it.  Students will work through Bonner Center sites to connect with families and show them how to access higher ed through information and visits. They will use education to understand and contextualize the larger cultural problems faced by newcomers. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50042 GST 150 004 Visual Documentation. 1 credit. Graded. MTW. 9:00am-2:00pm. Instructor: Andrew Young. Visual documentation — the use of images, video, graphics, concept maps, sound— is important for capturing a project’s process and outcomes. For students, it is often the only way of effectively explaining what they have achieved or experienced. It challenges them to rethink information design and increase their skills beyond ineffective slideshows. Course skills are applicable across all fields (anthropology, biology, criminal justice, etc). The course prepares students to present work in a professional manner. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50047 GST 150 005 Language Study Skills. 2 credits. Credit/No Credit. TWR. 6:00pm-8:00pm. Instructor: Janet Starmer. In this course, we will explore the challenges of and strategies for being successful in a language course: note-taking, the use of flashcards, speaking practice, etc.  Students will gain exposure to the fundamentals of language learning such as the sounds of French or Spanish as well as basic vocabulary. This course is open to Traditional and CCE students who have not fulfilled the language requirement, who intend to take French/Spanish 101/111 this spring and who have anxiety about language learning or who want additional exposure to French/Spanish in advance. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50053 GST 150 006. GRE Prep Course. 0 credits. MTR 5:00-7:00pm. Instructor: Katherine Lambert-Scronce. Guilford College offers a no-credit preparation course for the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). This is the test most commonly used by graduate schools to evaluate applicants for admission. The GRE Prep course helps students become familiar with either the GRE® General Test, which measures verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, and analytical writing skills, or the GRE® Subject Tests, which are intended to gauge undergraduate achievement in one of eight specific fields of study. The January Term GRE Prep Course starts January 6. Costs: $500 and housing/meals according to policies.  Two required GRE study books  (to be purchased by instructor for each student) are included.
  • 50037  GST 250 013 Practically Bicycling. 2 credits. Credit/No Credit. TWR. 6:00pm-8:00pm. Instructor: Vance Ricks. This course focuses on bicycles not merely as works of art or a “kids’ toys”, but on the ways in which they are useful in everyday life — both to individuals and to communities. We’ll learn about urban planning; we’ll try different kinds of riding (roads, trails, bikeways, stationary machines) under different conditions; we’ll meet bicycle builders; and we’ll learn how to do basic bicycle maintenance and repair. NOTE:  You must have a bicycle of your own, and you must already know how to ride a bicycle. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50049 GST 250 014 Disability Awareness. 2 credits. Credit/No Credit. TWRF. 2:30pm-4:30pm. Instructor: James Parrigin. One fifth of the American population has or will develop a disability, yet people rarely think about what it means to be disabled unless it affects them directly. Right now in France, a wave of interest on the subject of disability has emerged, and the push for greater social understanding and educational policy-making recalls the energy of the U.S. Civil Rights movement of the 1960’s. This seminar will raise student awareness of disability culture by exploring events in culture, the public education system, and policy making in the U.S. that have propelled us toward equality and opportunity through selected readings, dynamic discussions with invited speakers, and on-campus accessibility “field trips,” and a viewing of the 2011 film Les Intouchables. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50036 GST 350 001 Improv Comedy and the Art of Interviewing. 3 credits. Credit/No credit. MTWRF. 1:00pm-5:00pm. Instructor: Alan Mueller. Every job interview is improvisational!  Participants in this experience will learn the art and the science of improv comedy, and through practice and reflection find connections that will better prepare them for job interviews.  This on-campus seminar-style course will be fun and engaging, while also providing a platform for skill-building.  Participants can also count on a field trip or two to Greensboro’s own Idiot Box comedy club. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50051 HIST 227 001 Urban Environmental History: Greensboro. 4 credits. Graded. MTWRF. 1:00pm-2:00pm. Excursions Monday through Saturday. Instructor: Damon Akins. Combining urban history which considers cities as historically constructed spaces, and environmental history which considers the implications of human actions on the non-human world, this course uses Greensboro as a lens to explore urban environmental history over the last two hundred years. Relying heavily on experiential exercises, the course broadly considers the human relationship with the “natural” world in the context in which most of us experience it: the urban environment. Costs: $500 plus $35 course fee, and housing/meals according to policies. Course fee covers field experiences.
  • 50050 IDS 455 001 Human Sexuality. 4 credits. Graded. MTWRF. 10am-1:00pm. Instructor: Kathy Tritschler. Interdisciplinary study of human sexuality that draws most prominently from the academic disciplines of biology, psychology, and sociology, and health education. Focused topics include sexual anatomy and physiology, birth control, pregnancy and childbirth, sexually transmitted diseases, gender development and identity, and sexual orientation. The course addresses both cognitive (knowledge) and affective (values, feelings, attitudes) objectives. Consistent with expectations for IDS 400 courses, this course also includes some advanced writing instruction. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Enrollment limited to seniors, minimum 88 semester credits earned. Prerequisite: Historical Perspectives.
  • 50033 JPS 350 002 Law and Social Justice. 4 credits. Graded. MTWR. 12:00pm-2:00pm and 6:00pm-8:00pm. Instructor: Barbara Lawrence. While answering the questions: if courts, law enforcement and community groups can effectively generate social change, and what are the advantages and limits of using the law to effect social change, students will investigate through practical inquiry if Greensboro needs a community justice center to more effectively address community problems. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50034 PHYE 100 001 Yoga Fundamentals Intensive. 1 credit. Credit/No Credit. MTWRF. 9:00am-11:30am. Instructor: Dawn Leonard. Yoga Fundamentals is an intensive physical activity program that addresses many aspects of yoga including postures, breath-work, meditation, chanting and traditional philosophical principles. The postures will include strengthening, stretching, and therapeutic applications to increase vitality, relaxation, and conscious living. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.
  • 50040 PPS 250 002 100 Ways to Change the World. 4 credits. Graded. MTWRF. 10:00am-5:00pm. Instructor: Kim Yarbray. So you want to change the world? This class will get you into the community to explore how organizations and practitioners (including many Guilford alums) are addressing significant social and ethical concerns. You will develop a portfolio of understanding that will help you seek change in ways consistent both with your own values and the lens of principled problem solving. Focus issues for this class include sustainability, incarceration, education, and community building. Costs: $500 plus $200 course fee, and housing/meals according to policies. Course fee covers field experiences.
  • 50052 REL 250 001 Friends Lobbying for Social Change. 3 credits. Credit/no credit. MTWRF. 9:00am-1:00pm. Instructor: Frank Massey. Students will explore Friends history of engaging governments to create social change from the founding of Quakerism.  Participants will spend the first two weeks on campus in lectures, research, and discussions of the history of Friends lobbying efforts.  The third week, participants will spend time in DC visiting FCNL lobbyists, DOD and DOJ officials, and Representatives and Senators learning about lobbying and lobbying. Estimated Costs: $500 plus $300 course fee, and housing/meals according to policies. Course fee covers field experiences.
  • 50043 THEA  250 002 January Term Theatre Production. 2 credits. Graded. MTWRF. 10:00am-1:00pm and 2:00pm-5:00pm, plus production work. Instructor: Jack Zerbe. This project engages students in a theatre ensemble as actors and technicians working cooperatively to create the Theatre Studies’ January term production of Animal Farm. This is experiential learning that develops a disciplined approach to the actor’s craft and knowledge of backstage production techniques. Thus, in addition to fulfilling the responsibilities of rehearsal and performance, students with a primary focus as actors are required to contribute no less than 10 hours per week working behind the scenes in one of several possible areas: construction, props, paint, costumes, lights, sound, publicity, box office, house management, and possible assistant stage management. Students with a focus on technical production will be permitted to spend the entire time behind the scenes, but will need to make significant contributions to no less than two areas. NOTE: all are required to participate at load-in and strike, in addition to their normal weekly hours. Actors seeking practicum credit toward the major or minor requirement may execute 1 credit’s worth of practicum while also receiving 1-3 credits for their work as a performer, totaling between 2 and 4 total credits. Technicians seeking practicum credit toward the major or minor requirement are expected to enroll for 2 credits, but a 4-credit experience has been reserved exclusively for the production stage manager. No one is permitted to do their first practicum during the January term with the exception of Assistant Stage Managers. The practicum work must be fully documented in digital portfolio as described later in this syllabus. Actors who are Theatre Studies majors must also document their performance in a digital portfolio. Estimated Costs: $500 and housing/meals according to policies. Students will be responsible for purchasing a script and make-up kit.
  • 50044 THEA  250 003 January Term Theatre Production. 3 credits. Graded. MTWRF. 10:00am-1:00pm and 2:00pm-5:00pm, plus production work. Instructor: Jack Zerbe. This project engages students in a theatre ensemble as actors and technicians working cooperatively to create the Theatre Studies’ January term production of Animal Farm. This is experiential learning that develops a disciplined approach to the actor’s craft and knowledge of backstage production techniques. Thus, in addition to fulfilling the responsibilities of rehearsal and performance, students with a primary focus as actors are required to contribute no less than 10 hours per week working behind the scenes in one of several possible areas: construction, props, paint, costumes, lights, sound, publicity, box office, house management, and possible assistant stage management. Students with a focus on technical production will be permitted to spend the entire time behind the scenes, but will need to make significant contributions to no less than two areas. NOTE: all are required to participate at load-in and strike, in addition to their normal weekly hours. Actors seeking practicum credit toward the major or minor requirement may execute 1 credit’s worth of practicum while also receiving 1-3 credits for their work as a performer, totaling between 2 and 4 total credits. Technicians seeking practicum credit toward the major or minor requirement are expected to enroll for 2 credits, but a 4-credit experience has been reserved exclusively for the production stage manager. No one is permitted to do their first practicum during the January term with the exception of Assistant Stage Managers. The practicum work must be fully documented in digital portfolio as described later in this syllabus. Actors who are Theatre Studies majors must also document their performance in a digital portfolio. Estimated Costs: $500 and housing/meals according to policies. Students will be responsible for purchasing a script and make-up kit.
  • 50045 THEA  250 004 January Term Theatre Production. 4 credits. Graded. MTWRF. 10:00am-1:00pm and 2:00pm-5:00pm, plus production work. Instructor: Jack Zerbe. This project engages students in a theatre ensemble as actors and technicians working cooperatively to create the Theatre Studies’ January term production of Animal Farm. This is experiential learning that develops a disciplined approach to the actor’s craft and knowledge of backstage production techniques. Thus, in addition to fulfilling the responsibilities of rehearsal and performance, students with a primary focus as actors are required to contribute no less than 10 hours per week working behind the scenes in one of several possible areas: construction, props, paint, costumes, lights, sound, publicity, box office, house management, and possible assistant stage management. Students with a focus on technical production will be permitted to spend the entire time behind the scenes, but will need to make significant contributions to no less than two areas. NOTE: all are required to participate at load-in and strike, in addition to their normal weekly hours. Actors seeking practicum credit toward the major or minor requirement may execute 1 credit’s worth of practicum while also receiving 1-3 credits for their work as a performer, totaling between 2 and 4 total credits. Technicians seeking practicum credit toward the major or minor requirement are expected to enroll for 2 credits, but a 4-credit experience has been reserved exclusively for the production stage manager. No one is permitted to do their first practicum during the January term with the exception of Assistant Stage Managers. The practicum work must be fully documented in digital portfolio as described later in this syllabus. Actors who are Theatre Studies majors must also document their performance in a digital portfolio. Estimated Costs: $500 and housing/meals according to policies. Students will be responsible for purchasing a script and make-up kit.

Seminars & Group Projects - Off Campus

Coming Soon

Study Away (Domestic)

  • Ghost Ranch Experience. 4 credits. Graded. 50001 GST 250 001. Location: Abiquiu, New Mexico. Austin College faculty onsite. Journey to this famous education and retreat center near Sante Fe, New Mexico, with its unique combination of natural beauty, paleontology, geology, archaeology, history and art. Students select their top choice and two backups from a range of class options: Silversmithing, Pottery, Weaving, Native American cultures, Creative Writing, and Painting. Experience wide-open spaces, starry skies, mountains, mesas and red rock formations in the multicultural nature and stunning landscape of a 21,000-acre working ranch, a rustic setting renowned for creativity and self-exploration. Includes formal reflection that makes deliberate connections between the disciplinary focus and the natural environment. Offered in partnership with Austin College. TENTATIVE DATES: January 2-25. Estimated cost: $2500-$2800 plus travel. Non-refundable $250 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Photography and a Sense of Place. 4 credits. Graded. 50002 ART 250 001/50003 PPS 250 001. Location: 6 days on campus, 14 away. Faculty leader: Maia Dery. A place-based, interdisciplinary, experiential course exploring the bottom of the Cape Fear River Basin (Guilford College is near the headwaters, at the top of the same basin). After three preparatory days on campus, students will spend two weeks at the Barrier Island Study Center on Bald Head Island. Students will share and photograph this exceptional place with the year-round residents, including American alligators, red foxes, and loggerhead turtles, kayaking through salt marshes, while learning about barrier island and beach ecology. PPS will fund guest lectures in Natural Sciences and Humanities to complement the primary theme of the course, documenting and creating a culture of place as defined by water. For the last three days, students return to campus to finish an independent project including a portfolio of images or video and text documenting their experiences and understanding of the place. Fulfills the Arts requirement. Estimated cost: $1597.50 APPLY for this experience.
  • Wolves and Northwoods Carnivores: Predatory Ecology. 4 credits. Graded. 50004 BIOL 250 001. Location: Northwoods, Ely and the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota. No Guilford faculty presence. The Audubon Center of the Northwoods sponsors this project that covers a broad range of topics related to wildlife with a focus on the gray wolf, lynx and the white-tailed deer, and other predators, plus many of the animals directly or indirectly associated with or affected by these predators as prey. The course is field-oriented and includes opportunities for back country travel, wildlife observation and tracking, as well as an introduction to habitats, how wildlife respond to natural and artificial disturbance, and human factors. Additional topics include wildlife research techniques, data acquisition and analysis, as well as management practices. Includes visits to the Wildlife Science Center, the North American Bear Center, the International Wolf Center, Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, and Minnesota’s North Shore of Lake Superior. DATES: January 1-19, 2014. Estimated cost: $1699 plus travel to/from the site and transcript fee. $100 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.

Study Abroad (International)

  • Australian Summer, The Power of: Integrating Sport, Culture, Health & Wellbeing. 3 credits. Graded. 50005 SPST 250 001. Location: Sidney, Melbourne, and Canberra, Australia. No Guilford faculty presence. Arcadia University’s College of Global Studies has designed the experience for students who wish to gain an understanding of the significance of sport and recreation in Australian culture. The course includes lectures, guest speakers, field trips and activities that focus on a range of sporting/recreation pursuits in society while exploring the dimensions of health and wellbeing. A critical analysis of the practice and meaning of sport and health in Australian culture provides an understanding of not only the unique nature of Australian sport, health & wellbeing, but also of Australian culture and society. Includes experience of the Australian bush and natural landscapes. Required minimum 2.5 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: January 2-23. Estimated cost: $4590, plus airfare and food. $500 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Bali: Religion, Healing Arts, and the Environment. 4 credits. Graded. 50006 GST 250 002. Location: Bedulu, Bali and Yogyakarta, Java. Austin College faculty leader: Dr. Ivette Vargas-O’Bryan. This collaboration between Austin College and the School for International Training (SIT), a pioneer in experiential, field-based study abroad, will expose students to the dynamic relationships between religion, the healing arts and the environment in the local traditions of Bali. Bali is a province of Indonesia with an amalgamation of diverse traditions, such as Indian Hinduism, Buddhism, and local animistic beliefs. Local traditions are closely connected with the natural environment and its healing properties. The course will explore how environmental concerns are interwoven with art, ritual and traditional healing by engaging students in the history of Javanese and Balinese culture, theoretical and ethical concerns, and the practices of medical and local healers, artists and conservation experts. This course will also immerse students in Balinese culture through homestays and hands-on activities such as engaging in yoga and local healing traditions and conservation projects alongside training in field methods. TENTATIVE DATES: December 30-January 21. Estimated Cost: $4300-$4900 including airfare and some meals. Non-refundable $250 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Caribbean Sailing and Leadership. 2 credits. Graded. 50008 GST 250 003. Locations: Dominica, Grenada, Ile des Saintes, Montserrat, Nevis, St. Barts, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Martin, Statia, Trinidad and Tobago. No Guilford faculty presence. Broadreach College provides a 50-foot boat for endless opportunities to lead, bond, master new skills, and achieve. This course puts students at the helm – of the boat, the journey, the crew and most of all, the overall experience. Learn basic seamanship, navigation and more as you sail 500 nautical miles, past 15 Caribbean islands. Sail through the night on 80-mile, 15-hour jaunts. Learn and practice Theories of Risk Management, effective leadership, group dynamics, problem solving and decision-making. A large portion of the program lies in the hands of the students themselves. Each student leads a segment, plans passages, maintains a budget, and guides discussion. Required minimum 2.5 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: December 27-January 20. Estimated cost: $5480 (including lodging and food), plus airfare. $1000 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Caribbean Tropical Marine Biology. 3 credits. Graded. 50009 GST 250 004. Location: Leeward Islands: Ile Fourche, Saba, St. Barts, St. Kitts, St. Martin, Statia. No Guilford faculty presence. This Broadreach College program is an eye-opening exploration of the biology and ecology of marine communities. Living aboard a 45-foot yacht and hopping from one diverse island to another, gives students the freedom and flexibility to discover the unparalleled diversity of ecosystems found in this tropical region of the world. Learn under the guidance of professional marine biologists. Tackle marine conservation. Understand the biochemical nature of marine environments. Learning is always active, experiential and enlightening — never boring. Required minimum 2.5 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: December 27-January 20. Estimated cost: $5680 (including lodging and food), plus airfare. $1000 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Chile: Clinical Observation and the Cultural Aspects of Health Care. 3 credits. Graded. 50010 GST 250 005. Location: Santiago, Chile. No Guilford Faculty presence. IES Abroad offers this project (ideal for students considering careers in health-related fields), which offers the opportunity to learn about health care policy and delivery systems in the context of Chile’s community-centered public health care system. An important component of the program introduces students to historical, social, and cultural aspects of health care specific to Chile, including the treatment of illness and patients’ rights. The project is one course divided into two components: Clinical Observation (examines the epidemiology and prevalence of frequent health deviations) and Intensive Spanish, designed for students who do not have any previous training in Spanish. Required minimum 3.0 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: January 3-25.Estimated cost: $3175 (including homestay and food) plus airfare. $500 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Costa Rica Cultural Connections. 4 credits. Graded. 50011 GST 250 006. Location: On campus and Costa Rica. Staff Leaders: Barbara Boyette and Georgiann Bodgan. Students explore the history, economy, and culture of Costa Rica with initial preparation on campus before the international study abroad. As part of the first week on campus, students read and study about the political history of Coast Rica and the impact on the social and economic development, as well as the influence of the Quakers within Costa Rica.  Thereafter, students travel and gain a direct understanding of the Costa Rican people, culture, and economy as well as an appreciation for its biodiversity. A bilingual excursion manager accompanies the group 24/7.  Students will engage in daily journaling to reflect on their experiences and synthesize what they learn about Costa Rica and themselves.  This international study will culminate with time on campus for presentations of their final project.  Estimated cost: $2791-$3070 including airfare, lodging, breakfast and dinner. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Dublin, Ireland: Actor Training Intensive at the Gaiety School of Acting. 3 credits. Graded. 50007 THEA 250 001. Location: Dublin, Ireland. No Guilford faculty presence. IES Abroad sponsors this conservatory-style training at Dublin’s Gaiety School of Acting. This intensive program is open to students at all levels of training and consists of intensive, practical rehearsal workshops, supplemented by elements of voice, movement and improvisation. Students read the plays of Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Sean O’Casey and John Synge and work in intensive rehearsals of scene work toward a final presentation. Includes visits to other cultural attractions, such as the James Joyce Museum, the National Museum of Ireland, and the Book of Kells in the historic library of Trinity College Dublin. Students will live in an apartment in a residential area of Dublin. Required minimum 3.0 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: January 4-26. Estimated cost: $3090, plus airfare and meals. $500 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • El Salvador Service Project. 3 credits. Credit/No Credit. 50012 GST 250 007. Locations: San Salvador and El Roble. No Guilford faculty presence. Join a service learning project to rebuild a village school in El Salvador, executed in partnership with Companion Community Development Alternatives Ltd. (CoCoDA) and DePauw University. Under the direction of Ivan Villasboa, executive director of CoCoDA, students begin with an orientation in the capital, San Salvador, and then move to the countryside village of El Roble, where they gain a broad understanding of El Salvador’s history, culture, challenges, and potential. Students meet local officials, government representatives, business leaders, and interview former political prisoners that were tortured during the Salvadoran civil war. You will also connect with a Salvadoran comunidad as you live and work alongside local families out in the fields.  Change the way you see the world—and how you see yourself.  Spanish language skills recommended, but not required. TENTATIVE DATES: January 3-21. Estimated cost: $1650 (including food), plus airfare and $10 airport entry fee. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • European Choir Tour. 1 credit. Credit/No Credit. 50013 MUS 250 001. Locations: Prague, Salzburg, and Vienna. Faculty leader: Wendy Looker. Singers in this touring ensemble will rehearse on campus for a week and a half before departing on a 10-day performing tour of Prague, Salzburg and Vienna. Cost includes roundtrip airfare, accommodations abroad, breakfast daily, four group dinners, travel by motor coach, and sightseeing per the itinerary. In between our five performances, we will experience “The Sound of Music” tour, Mozart’s Birthhouse, a guided music tour of Vienna, Esterházy Palace, Haydn Haus, the Musikverein of Vienna and much more! Estimated Cost: $3166 including airfare, daily breakfast and four dinners. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Florence, Italy: Arts, Business, and Italian Language. 3 credits. Graded. 50014 GST 250 008. Location: Florence, Italy.  No Guilford faculty presence. This program offered in partnership with ISA Studies Abroad gives students the opportunity to select from a range of classes in English (with the exception of language, which is taught in Italian) at Florence University of the Arts and Apicius International School of Hospitality. Courses at the College of Business include: “Strategic Luxury Brand Management” and “International Marketing,” at the College of Imaging and Visual Art: “Introduction to Digital Photography,” at the College for Food and Wine: “Food, Culture, & Society in Italy,” at the College of Interior Design: “Historical Building Restoration and Conservation,” at the College of Italian Studies: “Italian Language,” at the College of Liberal Arts: “Art and Architecture in Florence and Tuscany,” and at the College of Sports/Heath Studies: “The Italian Soccer Experience.” Courses will be taught by local and international faculty. For more information and before making your initial application to Guilford College, visit http://studiesabroad.com/programs/country/italy/city/florence. Required minimum 2.75 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: January 4-January 23. Estimated cost: $4400-$4840 plus airfare and food. $200 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • France, Spain and Morocco: Cultural Exploration. 3 credits. Graded. 50027 GST 250 012. Locations: Paris, Aix-en-Provence, Marseille, Marrakech, Casablanca, Rabat, Algeciras, Sevilla, Cordoba, Granada, Toledo, and Madrid. No Guilford faculty presence. This multi-country cultural exploration is sponsored by CIS Abroad and hosted by IAU College (Institute for American Universities). Dr. Carl Jurban, the president of IAU, travels with you throughout a three-week study trip. Experience everything from the markets of Morocco to the museums of Madrid with guest lectures by leading experts in the field. Particular attention will be paid to the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications. Students register for the experience as either Art History 395: Classical Islam and the European Renaissance, Cross Cultural Studies 395: Jews, Muslims and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World, French 395: Cultural History of France and the Islamic World, History 395: Cultural History of Europe and the Islamic World, Political Science 395: European Politics and the Islamic World, and Spanish 395: Cultural History of Spain and the Islamic World. Students are advised to get pre-approval from the appropriate Guilford department chair before they go. For more information and before making your initial application to Guilford College, visit http://www.cisabroad.com/january-study-abroad/multi-country/january-in-france-spain-morocco/program#anchorRequired minimum 2.5 GPA. TENTATIVE DATES: TBD (early January)-TBD (late January). Estimated cost: $4,890 plus airfare and some meals. $200 deposit required.APPLYfor this experience.
  • Galapagos Islands:  Evolutionary Theory Past and Present. 4 credits. Graded. 50046 BIOL 151 001. Location:  Quito, Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands. Faculty Leader:  Michelle Malotky. This course begins with a two-week excursion to the Galapagos Islands to study the environs where Darwin’s theory of Evolution emerged. Referring to historical texts and documents, students will emulate the early naturalists’ approach to data collection, keeping a field notebook of their observations. Upon return to campus, students will be introduced to methods used to examine species relationships through DNA analysis. In the spring semester, students will continue the construction of an Evolution “time-travel” portfolio, fulfilling requirements for Historical Perspectives. Estimated cost: $3640 plus airfare and visa. Meals and homestay included. $150 deposit required with application. Prerequisites: ENGL 102. APPLY for this experience.
  • Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Understanding Competing Narratives. 4 credits. Credit/No credit. 50015 GST 250 009. Location: Ramallah, Ibillin, Jerusalem – Israel/Palestine. Faculty leader: Max Carter. A repeat of the successful 2013 January term program, this three-week experience explores the religious, historical, political, and social narratives of Israelis and Palestinians. Students examine the conflict through the lenses of direct experience and those personally involved on both sides, especially individuals actively engaged in work toward a just peace. This project helps students develop an understanding of the complexity of a conflict in which there are at least two narratives that are both true – but don’t meet. Estimated cost: $2700 (including most meals), plus airfare. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • London: Comparative Criminal Justice. 4 credits. Graded. 50016 JPS 350 001. Location: On campus and London, England. Faculty Leader: Will Pizio. After a week of evening classes on campus that provide conceptual grounding, the group travels to London, England with the goal of understanding the English criminal justice system while comparing it to the system in the U.S. There will be a significant experiential component requiring students to visit prisons, observe court proceedings, and interact with police officers.  Discussions and written work will help students reflect on their observations, reaching a deeper understanding of the similarities and differences between two judicial systems. Practitioner guest speakers will also be arranged.  Estimated cost: $3258 including airfare. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Myanmar/Burma: The Experience of Theravada Buddhism. 4 credits. Graded. 50017 REL 250 001. Location: Myanmar. Faculty leader: Eric Mortensen. In this course we read about the Theravada Buddhist traditions of Myanmar/Burma, visit religious sites, speak with religious practitioners, and explore relationships between the historical and current practices of wisdom traditions in the area. We begin in Yangon, journey to ruins of the spectacular Buddhist cities of Bagan and Mrauk U, and conclude with a meditation retreat on Ngapali beach. This course is both academic and experiential. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA, application, & permission of instructor. Fulfills the Intercultural requirement. TENTATIVE DATES: January 3-24.  Estimated cost: $3240 (including food) plus airfare and visa (approximately $2050 more). $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Netherlands: Economics of European Integration–challenges, policies, and practices in the European business environment. 4 Credits. Graded. 50018 BUS 250 001. Location: Center for European Studies (CES), Maastricht University, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. The course examines the key economic policy areas of the European Union and offers an analysis of the different approaches to regional economic integration throughout the history of the European Union. The course analyzes the economic bases for the rise of the European Union from its origins in the post-World war II recovery to its historic enlargement in 2004 and 2007. The theory of the economic integration process will be applied to a business setting, with a series of business cases illustrating how a variety of firms are responding strategically to the establishment of the Economic and Monetary Union and the accession of new Member-States. Students are given advice and guidance on using case studies and how to evaluate the strategies choices made by firms. CES staff also takes students to important institutions that will deepen an understanding of the topic. They also take students on cultural excursions and fun activities during two 3-day weekend trips to Belgium and the Netherlands. Recommended minimum 3.0 GPA. Estimated cost: $3795-$4175, plus airfare, food and city bus pass. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Netherlands: International Environmental Law. 4 Credits. Graded. 50019 ENVS 250 001. Location: Center for European Studies (CES), Maastricht University, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. This course examines the role of international law in protecting the environment. It takes a fundamental approach which means that we will examine environmental law from the perspective of principles, environmental rights, and the choice and design of regulatory instruments. Both strengths and, unfortunately, weaknesses will be discussed. As far as international law is falling short, the importance of national approaches will be addressed. Some specific attention will go to the European Union as an regional international organization addressing, inter alia, environmental problems. The world-wide problem of climate change serves as the leading case of this course. Includes a paper, presentation, and final exam. Students are also taken on excursions to important institutions that will deepen an understanding of the topic. CES staff takes students to The Hague and Amsterdam, where they visit the ‘Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment’, the ‘International Court of Justice’ and ‘Greenpeace International Office’. We will also visit Brussels (Belgium), where we will go to the European Parliament and European Commission. During both study trips, you will be able to experience more of Europe via interesting cultural excursions and fun activities. Recommended minimum 3.0 GPA. Estimated cost: $4515-$4967, plus airfare, food and city bus pass. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Netherlands: International Relations and Politics in the EU. 4 credits. Graded. 50020 PSCI 250 001. Location: Center for European Studies (CES), Maastricht University, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. Comprehensive coverage of the key political and economic policies of the European Union with analysis of the different approaches to regional integration throughout the history of the European Union. Analyzes the historical, political and economic bases for the rise of the EU from its origins in the post-World war II recovery to its historic enlargement in 2004 and 2007. Also examines human rights with a comparison between the European and UN-framework for the protection of human rights applied to specific cases. This course will be highly interactive and engaging. Students are also taken on excursions to important institutions that will deepen an understanding of the EU and its political and legal processes: Brussels, the capital of Belgium and the EU, where we will visit the European Parliament and the European Commission. The second weekend students go to The Hague and Amsterdam to visit the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court. During both study trips, you will be able to experience more of Europe via interesting cultural excursions and fun activities. Recommended minimum 3.0 GPA. Estimated cost: $3535-$3885, plus airfare, food and city bus pass. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Netherlands: Positive Psychology. 4 credits. Graded. 50021 PSY 250 001. Location: Center for European Studies (CES), Maastricht University, The Netherlands. No Guilford faculty presence. In this course, students will get acquainted with the field of positive psychology, gaining insight in different theories, scientific findings, experiments and measurement tools. As an applied science, the results of positive psychology lead to the creation of real-world interventions that can improve school, businesses, governments, and other aspects of individual and social life. Throughout workshops and interactive meetings, students will be provided not only with tools to be able to evaluate and design research in the area of positive psychology, but also with the skills to apply some (basic) intervention techniques. During two weekends, CES staff takes students around different European cities for cultural excursions and activities. Recommended minimum 3.0 GPA. Estimated cost: $4515-$4967, plus airfare, food and city bus pass. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Oxford Fantasy Writers. 4 credits. Graded. 50022 ENGL 250 001. Location: Oxford, England. Faculty leader: Caroline McAlister. Students will explore the relationship between place and imagination in the writings of the four British fantasists, Lewis Carroll, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R.Tolkien, and Philip Pullman. These writers all spent most of their adult lives living and working in Oxford. While their fictional works are set in alternate fantastical worlds, they all found their inspiration in the physical reality of Oxford’s libraries, living quarters, churches, pubs, and parks. Students will visit sites frequented by the authors and sites referenced in their works and compose journals reflecting on those visits. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and HP. Recommended minimum 3.0 GPA. Estimated cost: $2065-$2272 (including most breakfasts) plus airfare. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Panama & Costa Rica Primate Behavior and Conservation. 3 credits. Graded. 50023 GST 250 010. Locations: Bocas del Toro, Cariari, Pacuare River, Quepos, San Jose. No Guilford faculty presence. Work with Broadreach College to learn everything you ever wanted to know about monkeys, in a place where your hands-on work can further their survival and preserve their endangered habitats. Learn about primate biology, behavior, natural history and ecology in a spectacular rainforest setting. Participate in ongoing monkey research alongside primatologists. Then assist local organizations with animal rehabilitation, reforestation, conservation and education efforts. The White-faced capuchins, spider monkeys, squirrel monkeys and mantled howler monkeys need you.  TENTATIVE DATES: December 27-January 20. Estimated cost: $4980 (including food), plus airfare. $1000 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Peru: Service and Social Issues in Latin America. 4 credits. Credit/No Credit. 50024 GST 250 011. Location: Lima, Peru. Staff leader: Jorge Zeballos. This service trip is specifically designed for students that are pursuing a Latin American studies degree and for those that are just interested in that part of the world. Students will participate in service opportunities in Lima. The most common needs include assisting with the growth and development of children, improving education for children, and improving health and a sense of dignity for the elderly. Students will stay together at a host house, a safe, comfortable place to reflect on the experience and enjoy the company of fellow volunteers. The project also includes opportunities to learn about Peruvian culture and history through visits to local sites and lectures by local experts. TENTATIVE DATES: January 4-23. Estimated Cost: $3473.25 (including food) plus airfare. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Seville: The Legacy of Spain’s Multicultural Formation. 4 credits. Graded. 50025 SPAN 250 001. Location: Seville, Spain. Faculty Leader: Sylvia Trelles. Experience Spanish culture today while studying the Spanish language and learning about the cultures that thrived in Spain during the Middle Ages and form the basis of the modern nation where you will live for a few weeks. Students will study Spanish at the intermediate level or above and will explore the legacy of the Romans, Christians, Jews and Muslims by visiting World Heritage sites such as the Mezquita in Cordoba, the Alhambra in Granada and the impressive cathedral of Seville. Costs include room and board with a family, language course, culture lectures, and trips to Ronda, Cordoba and Granada as well as sites in and near Seville. Prerequisite: SPAN 102, 112, or instructor consent. Estimated cost: $3505 (including food), plus airfare. $300 non-refundable deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Shanghai, China: Business Abroad. 4 credits. Graded. 50026 BUS 250 002. Location: On campus and Shanghai, China. Faculty leader: Deena Burris. Students explore international business in this project focused on Shanghai, one of the most important economic business hubs in China and the world. Students spend the term’s first week on campus preparing for the trip by examining the basics of global business, the Chinese business environment and economy, and the various types of international business organizational and management structures.  On a the following 9 days and 8 nights, student travel to experience the cultural excitement of Shanghai and visit the foreign owned companies of Coca Cola, Volkswagen, and Bayer China. They will also visit a US/Chinese joint venture company, a Chinese wholly owned subsidiary, and Chinese state owned company. Additional highlights of the trip include guest lectures on the growth of the Chinese economy as well as several cultural excursions, such as the Jade Buddha Temple, a Chinese acrobatic show, the Pearl Tower, and the Shanghai Museum. This trip is open to all students. Counts towards the International Business minor. Approval pending for the Business and Policy Studies general education requirement. Estimated cost: $3664 including airfare, plus food. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.
  • Siena, Italy:  Italian Language Intensive. 3 credits. Graded. 50054 GST 250 015. Location: Siena, Italy.  Faculty Coordinator: Jack Zerbe. Students take intensive Italian language classes 3.5 hours each morning, Monday through Friday, at La Scuola Leonardo da Vinci, Guilford’s partner for its semester long Fall program. All levels of language study are available: from beginner to advanced. La Scuola is located in the center of Tuscany’s historic old Siena, a short walk from the Piazza del Campo, the place travel expert Rick Steves calls, “the most beautiful piazza in Europe.” In addition to taking language class, students propose and complete a 10-15 page research paper on a subject readily accessible in Siena or nearby Florence, with art, history, and politics being recommended as especially good topics. Students will live in the home of an Italian family, who provides a traditional Italian breakfast and dinner. This program is suitable for upper-level students with a self-motivated academic focus, and also for those who have studied previously in Siena, but want to deepen or hone their previously acquired language skills. DATES: January 5-24. Estimated cost: $1881 plus airfare. Lunches and local excursions not included. $150 deposit required. APPLY for this experience.


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How do I do a January Term?

Internship

  • Find a faculty sponsor from the academic department in which you want to do an internship. Talk to the Internship Coordinator if you need guidance on how to secure the right sponsor.
  • Work with your faculty sponsor and the Career Development Center to find an internship site suited to your goals.
  • Utilize a counselor in the Center to develop your resume and a cover letter for an application.
  • Determine how many credits the internship will be (1-4), listed as either DEPT 290 or 390.
  • Complete internship paperwork through the Career Development Center and submit to registrar’s office.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact: Internship Coordinator at 336.316.2187

Service Project

  • Determine if one of the College’s ongoing service projects is a good fit. If not, discuss your own ideas with James Shields in the Bonner Center.
  • If you want credit from a particular department for your project, get a sponsor from that department, secure the department chair’s approval, (and a representative from Early College, if you’re a student in ECG). If general studies credit is acceptable, ask James Shields to be your sponsor.
  • Determine # of credits for the project (1-4).
  • Fill out the independent project form available in the registrar’s office at New Garden Hall.
  • Submit to registrar during the registration period.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact:  James Shields at 336.316.2447

Independent or Group Project

  • Brainstorm with a faculty sponsor or mentor to develop your project idea.
  • Secure a faculty sponsor or mentor and flesh out the details and timing of your project.
  • Secure the sponsor or mentor’s formal approval for your project.
  • Fill out an independent project form (available in the registrar’s office at New Garden Hall), and obtain both the sponsor/mentor’s and department chair’s signed approval.
  • Submit to the registrar’s office in New Garden Hall during advertised registration period.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact:   your academic advisor

Seminar

  • Consider how different experiences on the list will enrich your academic profile and personal development.
  • Pick from the list of existing experiences.
  • If you want a seminar to count towards your major, choose a graded experience.
  • Go to Banner and register for one experience. Refer to the calendar for registration dates.
  • Apply for January term housing and pick a meal plan in Banner Web if you will be on campus at any time.
  • Purchase required course materials before the start of the January term.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact:  the instructor of the seminar

Study Away (Domestic)

  • Requires a two-stage application:  starting on Guilford’s Study Abroad website.
  • Find your initial application at Study Abroad’s interactive online map; search by term, choosing Winter 2014.
  • Stage two applications involve either the off-campus partner or an interview with the faculty leader to be started after approval by the Guilford College Study Abroad office.
  • Deposits are due with initial application; become non-refundable with acceptance.
  • For Ghost Ranch experiences, pick your top three choices. First choice is not guaranteed. 
  • Deadlines are early. See calendar.
  • Refund policies vary from program to program.
  • For “Photography and the Power of Place,” see housing and board policy.
Contact:  Study Abroad staff in King Hall 107 or 112

Study Abroad (International)

  • Many require a two-stage application:  starting on Guilford’s Study Abroad website and ending with an affiliate partner. See descriptions.
  • Find your application at Study Abroad’s interactive online map; search by term, choosing Winter 2014.
  • Apply to ONE abroad project only. Deadlines are early. See calendar.
  • Deposits are due with your initial application. See program descriptions for amounts.
  • For partner programs only, after being approved by Guilford, submit a stage two application to the partner.
  • Upon acceptance, deposits become non-refundable.
  • Refund policies vary from program to program with a short window for withdrawal and severe penalties.
  • For experiences that include on campus instruction, see housing and board policy.
Contact:  Study Abroad staff in King Hall 107 or 112

Overview

Q.

What is January term?

A.

The January Term immerses students and faculty in intensive educational experiences that are deliberately innovative and experiential with the explicit goals of encouraging self-motivated independent learning and the ability to understand issues and concepts in action.

Q.

How many credits can I earn?

A.

All January term experiences are credit-bearing. Students earn 1-4 credits with the following approximate workload expectations for total time spent per week (including homework): 1 credit = 13.5, 2 credits = 27 hours, 3 credits = 40 hours, 4 credits = 53.5 hours. All experiences generate credits that count toward the 128 required for graduation, but only graded experiences may count towards a major or minor.

Q.

What kind of experiences are included?

A.

Internships, Service Learning, Independent Projects, Group Projects, Seminars, and Study Away.

Q.

What about the cost?

A.


Tuition for all experiences other than the posted study abroad/away experiences will cost $500; this is a flat fee for internships, independent and group projects, on-campus seminars, or other experiences – regardless of the number of credits. Students participating in a one credit experience and who apply for a January Term Grant will receive a grant award. For on campus room and board policies and fees, see the housing and food section. Study away experiences (domestic and international) incur fees as specified in the experience descriptions. Some include airfare, but some do not.

Q.

What about financial aid?

A.

Students cannot use their semester financial aid to defray costs, but may apply for special grants that will help pay for the experience. See “January Term Grants” section. Students participating in a one credit experience and who apply for a January Term Grant will receive a grant award.

Q.

What about Early College?

A.

Early College students at Guilford have the option to participate in January Term opportunities, with the decision concerning participation and payment of tuition/fees made by students and parent/guardians. Families/students who choose to participate will work directly with Guilford College to register for January Term. Any credits earned during the January Term will be included on the respective student’s Guilford College transcript, not the Early College at Guilford high school transcript.

Q.

What if I am not a Guilford student?

A.

Participation is open to anyone who applies to become and is accepted as a visiting student. Send a completed visiting student application to the registrar. Priority is given to current students.

Q.

What about housing and food costs?

A.

Traditional students who already live on campus and participate in experiences that take place on campus for any time are required to live in their semester housing without an additional housing fee, but must purchase one of several meal plan options. Those meals plans are: 60 meals for $335, 52 meals for $298, 42 meals for $247, 30 meals for $180, 15 meals for $88 (available only to those on campus for 11 days or less). Residence halls are open only to J-term participants. Students will not receive campus housing for January Term only. See housing and board policies and procedures on the Residential Life Intranet page.

Q.

How do deposits work?

A.

There are no deposits required for on campus experiences. However, study away (international and domestic) both require a deposit at the time of application. See descriptions for amounts. Deposits become non-refundable upon acceptance to the program and are payable to Guilford College by check or credit card. The amount of the deposit is credited to the final bill.

Q.

What is the policy on costs refunds?

A.

Refund policies vary from experience to experience with a short window for withdrawal that often closes long before the start of the experience. Students who withdraw after that period will be charged from between 25% -100% of the cost. For refund schedules of study away/abroad, see the study abroad web site and partner web sites. On campus experience costs are fully refundable until the last day to drop without a grade.

Q.

What is a January term grant?

A.

It is a modest amount of money granted as a tuition discount at an average range of 10-15%, for which students must apply. Awards are competitive, limited, and based on demonstrated need. Students participating in a one credit experience and who apply for a January Term Grant will receive a grant award. Applications available online at the January term web site. Completed applications must be e-mailed to Jeff Favolise (favoliseje@guilford.edu) by the last day before Fall break.