Academics

Academic Calendar

Fri Apr 08

January Term 2017-At Guilford-Registration

Thru: Monday, November 14, 2016
Thu Jul 28

Full Term Classes Ends

Thu Jul 28

Full Term Final Examinations Held During Last Class Period

January Term

Descriptions

Internships/Service/Independent & Group Projects

  • Internships . 1-4 Credits. Graded. Career Development Center assists students with finding sponsors and appropriate opportunities. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Service Projects . 1-4 Credits. Credit/No credit. Contact James Shields in the Bonner Center. Cost TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Independent Projects . 1-4 Credits. Graded or Credit/No Credit. Faculty or staff sponsor required. Cost TBD. Board fee for those living on campus. 
  • Group Projects. 1-4 Credits. Graded or Credit/No Credit. Faculty or staff sponsor required. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.
  • Center for Principled Problem Solving. 1-4 Credits. Credit/No Credit. Mark Justad is the staff sponsor. Staff will support independent or group student projects. See Mark Justad for information. Cost is TBD. Board fee for those living on campus.

On Campus Experiences & Seminars

Investigating the Book
ART 250 Students will explore different types of surface designs including paste papers, uruauchi and printing. In addition, we will also cover the history of sewn and adhesive book structures as well as how they are made, considering both traditional and innovative methods. This course will culminate with a collaborative printmaking and bookbinding project that will incorporate text and imagery. A field trip to the BookWorks studio in Asheville, N.C. will further expose students to the world of book arts. Instructor: Mary Beth Boone. Graded. Credits: 3. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $125.

Crime Assessment in Forensic Science
BIOL 250 This course introduces the student to the use of tools that allow for an analysis of probative evidence (physical, direct and circumstantial) in crime scenes, by its presence or absence that meets a recognizable pattern of crime behavior. The first part of the course will examine the theoretical basis of crime assessment and the roles played by the criminological ad psychological continuums. The second part of the course will focus upon the key roles that power and anger play in crime behavior and typologies. In the culmination of the heretofore learning, the course will discuss applied methods for identifying the perpetrators of crime. The 3-credit version of the course is an intensive 9 day workshop led by Richard Walter, a criminal psychologist and scholar-in-residence at the School of Forensic Sciences at the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences and co-founder of the Vidocq Society that investigates cold cases pro bono. This workshop will have the following required meetings: Saturday, January 7: 9 am-5 pm; Sunday, January 8: noon-5 p.m.; Monday-Friday, January 9-13, 6-9 p.m.; Saturday, January 14: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, January 15: noon-5 p.m.; Students who choose the 4-credit option will continue work with Bryan Brendley for the remainder of January Term. Instructor: Bryan Brendley. 3 credit: Credit/No Credit; 4 credit: Graded. Credits: 3 or 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.

Digital Graphic Design
CTIS/THEA 274 An introductory course to the Adobe Creative Suite concentrating on Photoshop and Illustrator but also introducing After Effects. Students will complete a series of projects using existing photos to create digital art for print in Photoshop, and generating new imagery in Illustrator. The focus of the course is learning the tools and the software with an integrated focus on design and aesthetics. Instructor: Robin Vest. Graded. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $30. Students should also have print funds in their accounts to generate 100 color pages of print. Satisfies arts requirement.

The Binge 
ENGL 250 This experiential course will explore the concept of "binging" as we consume multimedia-- in theory and practice.  We will read several articles on binging from various disciplinary viewpoints, some of which say it is the "new normal" while others claim it is unhealthy. Additionally, we will create our own local binge experiments: we will binge-watch an entire TV series over four days, binge-read an entire book series over four days, and binge-play a video game over two days.  As we do so, we will track our bodies' reactions and use the data to support or challenge claims about the attraction of binging on media. Instructors: Heather Hayton and Rachel Riskind. Graded. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Some weekend meetings required; class schedule during week may vary; consult with instructors for more information.

GRE Prep Course
GST 150 Guilford College offers a no-credit preparation course for the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). This is the test most commonly used by graduate schools to evaluate applicants for admission. The GRE Prep course helps students become familiar with either the GRE® General Test, which measures verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking and analytical writing skills, or the GRE® Subject Tests, which are intended to gauge undergraduate achievement in one of eight specific fields of study. Instructor: Katherine Lambert-Scronce. Credits: 0. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.

Woodworking and Furniture History
GST 150 The course introduces students to the basics of traditional American woodworking and furniture making. Starting with the tree in the forest, we’ll learn to identify the primary types of wood used for furniture in this area, to understand some basic wood technology and we’ll follow the furniture making process through design, basic joinery, assembly, sanding and finishing. Through field trips to Old Salem, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and local Piedmont furniture makers, we’ll explore the history and variety of woodcraft in central North Carolina. Students will spend most of their time in the studio, learning the fundamentals of measurement, layout and hand tool use and they will complete a small furniture project by employing their skills. Students will also do a research presentation on a traditional American furniture style or maker/firm. The cost of this course includes the field trips, supplies and a starter set of hand tools. Instructor: Jim Hood. Credit/No Credit. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $550.

Living Exemplary Leadership
GST 250 This two-credit course will be an exploration of individual strengths and talents through an experiential lens. Individuals will learn about their own leadership style, how that applies to group dynamics, and how they can use their skills and abilities to influence change. Instructor: Amy Costa & Steve Moran. Graded. Credits: 2. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.

Public Speaking for College and Career
GST 250 This crash course in public speaking won't equip you to become a professional motivational speaker. What it will do, though, is teach you the basics of giving speeches and presentations; long and short, formal and informal, business and casual. Students taking this course will give presentations, study the speech giving skills of others and hear from professionals across all disciplines who put speaking skills into practice at work. Instructor: Megan Walters. Credit/No Credit. Credits: 2. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.

Practically Bicycling
GST 250 Do you want to learn basic bicycle maintenance and repair, so that a flat tire or a broken chain won't defeat you? Want to try different kinds of riding in and around Greensboro, from roads to trails to bikeways? Want to learn about the links between bicycling, economics, community and equity? Then you should take this course -- it'll make you a more confident, knowledgeable, adventurous, and whimsical bike rider! Instructor: Vance Ricks. Credit/No Credit. Credits: 2. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $100 (for a set of equipment consisting of a multitool; front and rear lights; a rear-view mirror; a pump; two spare inner tubes; a patch kit; chain degreaser; chain lubricant).

Science Education and Science Fairs
GST 350 The purpose of this course is to immerse students in "what is good science" and "what are good science fairs." Students will work with public school faculty and students in helping create and judge science fairs. Additionally, students will play an integral role in the planning, development and supervision of the Guilford County science fair, held on Guilford’s campus in January 2017. Instructor: David Hildreth/Steve Shapiro. Graded. Credits: 3. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies.

Improvisational Comedy and the Art of the Job Interview
GST 350 Improv Comedy and the Art of the Job Interview explores the connections between the skills associated with short-form improvisational comedy and effective interview techniques. This highly experiential course pushes students to attain new levels of comfort thinking on their feet in a variety of settings and formats. This course enhances public speaking skills while also teaching students practical skills that will pay off in formal interview settings. Instructor: Alan Mueller. Credit/No Credit. Credits: 3. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $45.

Understanding Poverty
IDS 435 Examines the causes, dynamics and ramifications of poverty in America and other cultures. Provides opportunities for critical thinking and useful synthesis to deepen understanding of poverty and/or just catch up with the state of interdisciplinary knowledge, policies and remedial actions. Explores the cultural and structural factors contributing to poverty including the settings of family, neighborhoods, schools, communities, access to extra-familial opportunities and individual level attributes. Instructor: Edwins Gwako. Graded. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Prerequisites: Historical Perspectives, 88 semester credits earned (senior standing) Fulfills IDS requirement.

A Cultural History of Ancient Greece from Homer to the Death of Socrates
IDS 452 This advanced seminar is designed, by employing interdisciplinary methods, to introduce the student to the literature, myth, and history of culture in archaic and classical Greece (ca. 800-400 BCE). Students will trace the transformations in Greek culture by comparing how the Greeks, at successive times in their history, understood key cultural ideas, which they developed and elaborated in the course of their history. Instructor: Tim Kircher. Graded. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Prerequisites: Historical Perspectives, 88 semester credits earned (senior standing) Course materials fee: $200 for travel to museums. Fulfills IDS requirement.

Developmental Psychology
PSY 224 Developmental psychology is the study of how and why people change over time and also, how and why they remain the same. It is hoped that by taking this course you will become critical thinkers, that you will become aware of the ways in which social, political and cultural trends affect individuals, and that you will learn to appreciate people of all ages, cultures and backgrounds. This course will be a hybrid course: we will meet face-to face once a week (6-10 p.m. on Mondays) for three weeks, and the remaining hours will occur through online work and with field work hours. Instructor: Karen Tinsley. Graded. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Hybrid course. Class will meet face-to-face once a week 6:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. on Mondays for three weeks, and the remaining hours will occur through online work, and with field work hours. Fulfills social science requirement.

Native American Religions
REL 200 This class examines Native American spiritual traditions as observed and expressed in Native American history, culture and practice. The class focuses primarily on the Dine´ (Navajo), Lakota (Sioux) and Ani'-Yun'-wiya (Cherokee) nations. Attention will be given to the interactions of Native nations with European and Euroamerican people and culture, to gender and gender diversity among Native nations, and to developing an appropriate lens for engaging Native cultures. The class includes two overnight trips, one to Washington DC and The National Museum of the American Indian and one to The Museum of the Cherokee Indian in Cherokee, NC. Instructor: Mark Justad. Graded. Credits: 4. Costs: $500, and housing/meals according to policies. Course materials fee: $350 for excursions. Fulfills humanities and diversity in the U.S. requirements.

Study Away (Domestic)

Wolves and Northwoods Carnivores:  Predatory Ecology
BIOL 250 The Audubon Center of the Northwoods sponsors this project that covers a broad range of topics related to wildlife with a focus on the gray wolf, lynx and the white-tailed deer, and other predators, plus many of the animals directly or indirectly associated with or affected by these predators as prey. The course is field-oriented and includes opportunities for backcountry travel, wildlife observation and tracking, as well as an introduction to habitats, how wildlife respond to natural and artificial disturbance and human factors. Location: Northwoods, Ely and the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota. No Guilford faculty presence. Graded. 4 credits. Cost: $1,875 plus travel to/from the site and transcript fee. Scholarships available from the Audubon Center (see Study Abroad website for details) $100 deposit required. Estimated dates: January 3-22. Special winter wear required.

Ghost Ranch Experience
GST 250 - Journey to this famous education and retreat center near Sante Fe, New Mexico, with its unique combination of natural beauty, paleontology, geology, archaeology, history, music and art. Students select their top choice and two backups from seven class options: Pottery, Silversmithing, Digital Photography, Archaeology/Paleontology, Weaving, Music, Creative Writing. Experience hiking in wide-open spaces, starry skies, mountains, mesas and red rock formations in this stunning landscape of a 21,000-acre working ranch, a rustic setting renowned for creativity and self-exploration. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in nearby day trips to: Santa Fe, Ojo Caliente, Bandelier, St. Ildefonso Feast Day dances, and more! Location: Abiquiu, New Mexico. Guilford faculty leader: (TBD). Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $2,950 plus travel. Some courses carry lab and/or materials fees ranging from $200-$400 (see Study Abroad website for details). Airport shuttle: $40. Meals and all accommodations included. Estimated dates: January 3-24. Winter wear required.

 

Study Abroad (International)

International Business, Culture and Sustainability: Focus on India
BUS 250 - This is an experiential course which will allow students to gain a greater appreciation of the influence of culture on human relations in general and business interactions specifically. Through pre-trip readings presentations, writings and discussion students will be introduced to the cultural differences between and India and the US, building a better understanding of life in India. This understanding will become the foundation for a cultural immersion in country during a 10 day trip to India. Students will experience Indian culture in person and gain insight into the business environment. Students will also explore and reflect on the growth of the Indian economy and form conclusions regarding the sustainability of this growth. This is a team intensive experience and students are required to participate in group activities. Location: Delhi, Agra (Taj-Mahal), Bangalore. Guilford faculty leader: Michael Dutch. Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $4,500 including airfare. In-country meals include breakfast and some lunches/dinners. On-campus accommodation and meal plan subject to campus policy. Estimated dates: January 2-12 (India), 16-26 (on-campus, schedule TBD).

England: HP - The History of Science
CHEM 151 A historical perspective on the rise of science over the past centuries with a particular focus on key developments in and around London from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution through the rise of modern molecular biology after World War II. Using a variety of resources in London, Oxford and elsewhere, this course examines the considerable advances in energy technology, computing, chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, medicine, and public health and traces the people (Fleming, Lovelace, Babbage, Watson, Crick, Franklin, Watt, Turing, Snow and more), institutions, movements and false starts that led to much of our current science and technology. Guilford faculty leaders: Anne Glenn & Rob Whitnell. Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $4,675-$5,155 plus airfare. $500 non-refundable deposit which will be taken off charges for the program fee. Meals not included. Fulfills the historical perspectives requirement, but a second section allows students to take the course without doing it as HP. Note: the course does not count towards the chemistry major/minor. Estimated dates: January 5-25.

England: Oxford Fantasy Writers
ENGL 250 Students will explore the relationship between place and imagination in the writings of the four British fantasists, Lewis Carroll, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R.Tolkien and Philip Pullman. These writers all spent most of their adult lives living and working in Oxford. While their fictional works are set in alternate fantastical worlds, they all found their inspiration in the physical reality of Oxford's libraries, living quarters, churches, pubs and parks. Students will visit sites frequented by the authors and sites referenced in their works and compose journals reflecting on those visits. Extensive reading required before departure. Guilford faculty leader: Caroline McAlister. Graded. 4 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 102, 3.0 GPA or instructor consent. Estimated cost: $3,800 plus airfare. Meals not included. Fulfills humanities requirement. Estimated Dates: January 2-23.

El Salvador: Civic Engagement Service
GST 250. Join a civic engagement project executed in partnership with Companion Community Development Alternatives Ltd. (CoCoDA) and DePauw University. The goal is to finally finish rebuilding a school complex in the small rural El Salvador village of El Roble. Under the direction of Ivan Villasboa, executive director of CoCoDA, students begin with an orientation in the capital, San Salvador, and then move to the countryside village of El Roble, where they gain a broad understanding of El Salvador’s history, culture, challenges and potential. Students meet local officials, government representatives, business leaders and interview former political prisoners that were tortured during the Salvadoran civil war. You will also connect with a Salvadoran comunidad as you live and work alongside local families out in the fields. Change the way you see the world—and how you see yourself. Spanish language skills recommended, but not required. Locations: San Salvador and El Roble, El Salvador. Faculty leader: Irving Zavaleta. 3 credits. Credit/No Credit. Estimated cost: $3,200 including airfare and meals.

Costa Rica: Surfing Centuries
IDS 450. Legendary surfer Dorian Paskowitz said, “Surfing re-creates you. “ So does your education. This course will give you an opportunity to learn to surf; we’ll use a collection of primary sources and academic research as lenses for viewing many problematic histories and contemporary challenges while also reflecting on your education. Indigenous culture, colonialism, segregation, technological history, gender and race relations, and sustainability are just a few of the concepts we’ll wrestle with as we immerse our minds and bodies in this challenging experience. Location: Nosara, Costa Rica, Guilford faculty leader: Maia Dery. Graded. 4 credits. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA, historical perspectives, 88 credits. Fulfills IDS requirement. Estimated cost: $3,310 plus airfare. Estimated dates: January 2 - 24.

The Galápagos Triangle: Scientists, Tourists and Locals
BIOL 242, GEOL 242, JPS 250. Most people associate Galápagos with Darwin’s theory of evolution. Indeed, these geologically active islands with their unique wildlife represent an unparalleled laboratory for biological and geological studies. The Galápagos have also become a global destination for ecotourists. However, few people realize that 30,000 people call Galápagos home. Behind the portrayal of these islands as “pristine” is the reality of tensions between people and nature. We will explore the interplay between locals, scientists, and tourists and what it all means for conservation of the Galápagos. Location: Quito, Ecuador, Galápagos Triangle. Faculty Leaders: Christine Stracey, Holly Peterson, Krista Craven. Graded. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TBD. Counts towards; natural sciences and mathematics, social justice/environmental responsibility. Estimated cost: $4,845 - $5,530, plus airfare. Estimated dates: January 2 - 20.

Caribbean: Friends in Belize
REL 150 Students will spend the January term in Belize reviewing the history of Friends mission/service work in the country and region. Discussion and excursions will focus on determining the impact of Friends in the communities, education institutions and development projects in light of concerns about colonial influences. Participants will visit meetings and service centers, speaking with local Friends to obtain a sense of the Quaker influence, and provide a service to the local meeting(s) and Friends organizations. Location: Belize. Guilford faculty leader: Frank Massey. Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $2,000, plus airfare. Estimated dates: TBD.

Digitally Mapping China's Silk Road
REL/HIST 250 In this course we will travel along the breadth of China’s Silk Road – from Beijing to Kashgar. Students will engage with group projects collecting data, studying and digitally mapping cultural, historical, religious, artistic and other patterns of information. We will journey by train to sites along the Silk Road including the Great Wall, the Terracotta Warriors, Buddhist grottoes, oases of the Taklamakan Desert and the bazaars of Xinjiang. No Chinese language prerequisite. Prerequisite: Permission of instructors.Location: China. Guilford faculty leaders: Zhihong Chen, Eric Mortensen. Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $4,200 plus airfare. Fulfills the humanities and intercultural requirements. Estimated dates: January 4 - 25.

Alp Dreams: Winter Trails and Mountain Tales
GERM 350 Our experience begins on the slopes of an Austrian ski resort. Following a three-day ski trip/alpine experience (skiing optional), we will be based in Munich for the rest of the course. Our days will take us to a variety of Bavarian winter trails and our evenings will be devoted to the mountain tales of the Brothers Grimm and other German, Austrian and Swiss authors and filmmakers (literature in translation and films subtitled for non-German speakers). Location: Munich, Austrian Alps. Faculty leader: David Limburg. Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $3,000 plus airfare. Fulfills humanities requirement. Estimated dates: TBD.

Games of India
SPST 250 Students will travel to India to explore Indian culture through the lens of physical activity and sport. Participants will engage in interactive learning with tribal Indian school children from some of the poorest regions/families in modern India, from whom ancient Indian traditions are most alive and active. Specific attention will be given to the exploration of how sport reflects the skills, norms, attitudes and values of Indian culture. Discussions will consider issues of health promotion in India, and how to best administer health and fitness assessments of school children in collaboration with physical therapy faculty and students. Students will enjoy various cultural excursions (Ellora Caves, Daulatabad Fort, etc.) into the surrounding community, expanding their understanding of India’s diverse and layered history. Location: Aurangabad. Guilford faculty leader: Lavon Williams. Graded. 4 credits. Estimated cost: $2,250 plus airfare. Estimated dates: TBD.

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How do I do a January Term?

Internship

  • Find a faculty sponsor from the academic department in which you want to do an internship. Talk to the Internship Coordinator if you need guidance on how to secure the right sponsor.
  • Work with your faculty sponsor and the Career Development Center to find an internship site suited to your goals.
  • Utilize a counselor in the Center to develop your resume and a cover letter for an application.
  • Determine how many credits the internship will be (1-4) and whether it will be listed as a 290 or 390 internship.
  • Complete internship paperwork through the Career Development Center and submit to registrar’s office.
  • If you live on campus, review the room and board policy.
Contact: Megan Walters, Assistant Director for Internships, Career Development Center, at 336.316.2314

Service Project

  • Determine if one of the College’s ongoing service projects is a good fit. If not, discuss your own ideas with James Shields in the Bonner Center.
  • If you want credit from a particular department for your project, get a sponsor from that department, secure the department chair’s approval, (and a representative from Early College, if you’re a student in ECG). If general studies credit is acceptable, ask James Shields to be your sponsor.
  • Determine the number of credits for the project (1-4).
  • Fill out the January Term Student Project Proposal form available on this page or in the registrar’s office at New Garden Hall.
  • Submit to registrar during the registration period.
  • If you live on campus, review the room and board policy.
Contact: James Shields, Director of the Bonner Center for Community Service and Learning, at 336.316.2447

Independent or Group Project

  • Brainstorm with a faculty sponsor or mentor to develop your project idea.
  • Secure a faculty sponsor or mentor and flesh out the details and timing of your project.
  • Secure the sponsor or mentor’s formal approval for your project.
  • Fill out the January Term Student Project Proposal form available on this page or in the registrar’s office at New Garden Hall, and obtain both the sponsor/mentor’s and department chair’s signed approval.
  • Submit to the registrar’s office in New Garden Hall during advertised registration period.
  • See housing and board policy.

Contact: your academic advisor

Seminar

  • Consider how different experiences on the list will enrich your academic profile and personal development.
  • Pick from the list of existing experiences.
  • If you want a seminar to count towards your major, choose a graded experience.
  • Register for one experience on BannerWeb. Refer to the January Term calendar for registration dates.
  • Apply for January Term housing and pick a meal plan in BannerWeb if you will be on campus at any time.
  • Purchase required course materials before the start of the January Term.
  • If you live on campus, review the room and board policy.
Contact: the instructor of the seminar

Study Away (Domestic)

  • For all domestic experiences not led by a Guilford faculty or staff member, there is a two-stage application that starts at studyabroad.guilford.edu. Click “programs” and do a simple search for “January term.” Stage 1 applications are due on or before September 30.
  • Students applying to partner programs make a direct application to the off-campus partner once accepted by Guilford’s study abroad staff. Stage 2 applications are set by partner programs and must be completed prior to their established due date. Be sure to check with your partner program for this information and more regarding your application.
  • An enrollment fee of $175 is billed to students upon acceptance by study abroad. It becomes non-refundable at the end of October. Some partners will also require a deposit, which students pay directly to that partner.
  • For Ghost Ranch experiences pick your top three choices. First choice is not guaranteed.
  • Deadlines are early. Check the back page of the January term brochure for a detailed calendar of deadlines or contact the study abroad office.
  • The last day to withdraw from a Guilford faculty-led program without financial penalty is Friday, October 28. After this date, students who withdraw will be charged from between 25%-100% of the cost, depending on when the decision is made. For more details, visit the study abroad website.

Contact: Daniel Diaz, Director of Study Abroad or Robbie Van Pelt, Assistant Director of Study Abroad, studyabroad@guilford.edu, 336.316.2015

Study Abroad (International)

  • Experiences led by a Guilford College faculty/staff member require a one-stage application. For experiences organized and run by an independent off-campus partner, a two-stage application is required. See studyabroad.guilford.edu. Click “programs” and do a simple search for “January term.” Stage 1 applications are due on or before September 30.
  • Students applying to partner programs make a direct application to the off-campus partner once accepted by Guilford’s study abroad staff. Stage 2 applications are set by partner programs and must be completed prior to their established due date. Be sure to check with your partner program for this information and more regarding your application.
  • An enrollment fee of $175 is billed to students upon acceptance by study abroad. It becomes non-refundable at the end of October. Some partners will also require a deposit, which students pay directly to that partner.
  • The last day to withdraw from a Guilford faculty-led program without financial penalty is Friday, October 28. After this date, students who withdraw will be charged from between 25%-100% of the cost, depending on when the decision is made. For more details, visit the study abroad website.
  • Deadlines are early. Check the back page of the January term brochure for a detailed calendar of deadlines or contact the study abroad office.
  • For experiences that include on-campus instruction, see housing/board policy.
  • All students on study abroad experiences are required to attend and pass the study abroad orientation—a 1-credit graded course run on Sundays from October 23-November 20 from 12:30-3 p.m. A make-up session is available during the week for those with a conflict. If the orientation class puts you above 18 credits, you will not be charged an extra fee.
Contact: Daniel Diaz, Director of Study Abroad or Robbie Van Pelt, Assistant Director of Study Abroad, studyabroad@guilford.edu, 336.316.2015

Overview

Q.

What is January term?

A.

The January Term immerses students and faculty in intensive educational experiences that are deliberately innovative and experiential with the explicit goals of encouraging self-motivated independent learning and the ability to understand issues and concepts in action.

Q.

How many credits can I earn?

A.

Students earn 1-4 credits with the following approximate workload expectations for total time spent per week (including homework): 1 credit = 15 hours, 2 credits = 30 hours, 3 credits = 45 hours, 4 credits = 60 hours. All credits count toward the 128 required for graduation, but only graded experiences may count towards a major, minor, or general education requirement. Because January Term experiences are immersive, a student may only register for one experience in any January Term.

Q.

What kind of experiences are included?

A.

Internships, service learning, independent projects, group projects, On-campus seminars and study away.

Q.

How much does a January Term experience cost?

A.


All experiences other than study abroad/away will cost $500; this is a flat fee regardless of the number of credits. For on campus room and board policies and fees, see the housing and food section. Study away experiences (domestic and international) incur fees as specified in the experience descriptions.

Q.

What is the cost for room and board for students living on campus?

A.

Traditional students who already live on campus and participate in an experience that takes place on campus for any time maintain their semester housing assignment without an additional housing fee and must purchase one of several meal plan options. Those meal plan options are: 52 meals for $340; 42 meals for $279; 30 meals for $208; 15 meals for $101 (available only to those on campus for 11 days or less). Residence halls are open only to January Term participants. Students will not receive campus housing for January Term only. Students who do not live on campus may purchase a meal plan.

Q.

How much does a study abroad/away experience cost?

A.

Prices for study abroad/away typically include the academic and residential dimensions of the experience—some include meals, some do not. Most do not include airfare, but some do. See the experience descriptions for details or consult with the study abroad staff. Some experiences do have a component that takes place on the Guilford campus. If you live on the Guilford campus for 11 days of January Term or less, you will be required to purchase at least the 15 meal block plan. Once accepted into a study away/abroad experience, students are charged a $175 enrollment fee, which becomes non-refundable at the end of October. Some study away/abroad experience partners will also ask for a deposit, which the student pays directly to the partner.

Q.

What is the course materials fee?

A.

These fees cover costs for special equipment, speakers, and local travel required by certain on campus experiences. All fees are posted in the course descriptions on this page and the footnotes in the online course schedule.

Q.

What about financial aid?

A.

Students cannot use their semester financial aid to defray costs. Students participating in a study abroad/away experience may apply for a January Term grant; see below.

Q.

What is the policy on refunds?

A.

Refund policies vary from experience to experience with a short window for withdrawal that often closes long before the start of the experience. Students who withdraw after that period will be charged from between 25% -100% of the cost. For refund schedules of study away/abroad, see the study abroad web site and partner web sites. On campus experience costs are fully refundable until the last day to drop without a grade.

Q.

What about Early College?

A.

Early College students at Guilford have the option to participate in January Term opportunities, with the decision concerning participation and payment of tuition/fees made by students and parent/guardians. Families/students who choose to participate will work directly with Guilford College to register for January Term. Any credits earned during the January Term will be included on the respective student’s Guilford College transcript, not the Early College at Guilford high school transcript.

Q.

What if I am not a Guilford student?

A.

Participation is open to anyone who applies to become and is accepted as a visiting student. Complete the visiting student application available from this page and send the application directly to the Guilford College Registrar’s Office. Priority for enrollment in January Term experiences is given to currently enrolled Guilford College students.

Q.

Is a deposit required to register for a January Term experience?

A.

There are no deposits required for on campus experiences. However, study away (international and domestic) both require a deposit at the time of application. See descriptions for amounts. Deposits become non-refundable upon acceptance to the program and are payable to Guilford College by check or credit card. The amount of the deposit is credited to the final bill.

Q.

What is a January term grant?

A.

It is a small discount off the posted price of a January Term study abroad/away experience. Awards are limited in number and focused on financial need. Further information about applying for January Term grants will be available in August 2016.

For more information, email jterm@guilford.edu.