Academics

The Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Awards

About the Award

The Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Awards for English Majors provide financial assistance to deserving English majors for career planning and preparation. There are two separate award categories: the Summer Practicum Award and the Post Graduate Award. The Summer Practicum Award is for rising seniors wishing to pursue further study or internship work in the summer before their final year at Guilford; the Post Graduate Award is for graduating seniors wishing to pursue post-grad study or some other vocational discernment activity crucial to the transition from student to professional. The awards total $25,000.00, with the amount of each individual award determined by the requests of winning applications.

These awards are offered because a generous alumna recognizes the value of academic and professional experiences that enhance opportunities for personal growth and enrichment. The awards are intended to aid English majors in making the transition from student into a career built upon skills learned as an English major at Guilford College. These awards are also intended to foster community and networking within the English major and Guilford College alumni, and carry with them the responsibility to help mentor a new cadre of English majors toward their dream careers.

Award Specifics

 

Summer Practicum Award
Eligibility is open to all English majors with junior status heading into their final year at Guilford (rising seniors). The award must be used in the summer following the application—and the project undertaken must be completed by the beginning of the Fall semester.  As such, the Summer Practicum Award is intended to support projects that will provide career preparation and aid in the vocational discernment process. Individual grants in this category are expected to range between $500 – $2000. Applicants must clearly state how you will use the funds, the relevance of the project to your English major, how your project will further your vocational goals, and why you are deserving of the award.

 

Past Summer Practicum proposals were awarded funds for:

  • Taking a particular course not offered at Guilford but essential to preparing for graduate school application to programs in English, Creative Writing, or Literature;
  • Undertaking an internship;
  • Formally working as a literacy volunteer or teaching assistant to see if this career path is for you;
  • Gaining a certificate or specialized training that will help you blend your writing skills with technology, medical, financial or legal fields.
Post-graduation Award
Eligibility is open to all graduating seniors with an English major, including those who have already graduated in the previous December. Post Graduation Award applications are welcomed from students who were awarded the Summer Practicum Award as rising seniors, but no preference will be given to these applicants. The award is meant to be used after graduation and the project undertaken should have clear boundaries.  This award is meant to support an English major’s transition from student to professional, and to help students translate the skills they have learned as English majors into enter a career of their dreams.  Individual grants in this category are expected to range between $2000 -$5,000. Applicants must clearly state how the funds will be used, the relevance of the project to the English degree, how your project will further vocational goals, and why this project is deserving of the award.

 

Past Post-Graduation proposals were awarded funds for students who:

  • decided to pursue a career in teaching, and needed to fulfill the 5th year student teaching requirement, or wanted to teach abroad;
  • required supplemental income to take on a post-graduate internship or non-paying fellowship;
  • enrolled in a graduate or certificate program in a field related to English or writing;
  • pursued an apprenticeship in a specialized area of writing: medical, technical, legal, web, or financial writing.
Important notes for both award categories

 

We will only consider concrete, well-defined projects with built-in external accountability from a sponsoring agency, non-profit organization, university, or residency program. If the nature or viability of your proposed project changes between application and award, the grant may be withheld or cancelled at the discretion of the committee and donor. Thus, it is important to clearly articulate a “back-up” plan if you are awaiting acceptance into an internship, residency, or other competitive program for which you will apply the Gilbert Award.

Application Process

Interested applicants should complete the attached application and include an essay, observing the page limits.  A committee, including the donor, will evaluate the applications giving consideration to the following criteria: project viability, quality and coherence of the written proposal, relevance to skills learned while an English major, and the strength of the entire application. (Handwritten, incomplete, inaccurate, or late applications will not be accepted.)

This application consists of 3 parts:

  • Application Page (click link below this section)
  • Educational Objectives Essay: This is a 2-3 page formal essay proposal, detailing your project and how it will help you transition from earning an English degree to life beyond Guilford College. You should also be explicit about how the award would further your vocational objectives, and should discuss the outcomes, or end results, of this project and/or grant. 
  • Budget
*It is important that your name appear only on the Application Page and not on the Essay or Budget, as the committee seeks blind submissions. Be sure to identify whether you are applying for a Summer Practicum, or Post-Graduate award.

 

 

Deadline
Please submit completed application no later than 5:00 p.m., March 15 to:
 
Alan Mueller, Director 
The Career and Community Learning Center
Guilford College 
5800 West Friendly Avenue 
Greensboro, NC 27410

 

 

Notification
Award recipients will be notified by April 10th.

 

 

Follow-up Requirements
If your proposal is chosen, you will be expected to make regular progress reports, and provide a final project assessment, before receiving the last portion of funding.  The Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Award is also meant to encourage greater community-building and networking between alumni and current students in the English major. Thus, you will be expected to participate in a Gilbert Award alumni event, or to act as an online mentor for other graduating English majors, in the following year.

 

Dean's Writing Awards

First Year Writing

Submissions may deal with any subject in any field and may range from personal and original response to more conventional scholarly writing. We will judge the essays on clarity, sensitivity, and insight—criteria that are as appropriate to an autobiographical essay as to a scholarly work.

Personal/Reflective Writing

We will award first prize to that essay that best fuses voice, style, and compositional skill in a non-scholarly context. Suitable essay types include narration, description, and reflection. Sophomores through seniors are eligible.

Scholarly/Critical Writing

We will award first prize to that essay from the arts, business and policy studies, humanities, or social sciences that explores an academic topic with the greatest originality and insight and the most engaging style. Sophomores through seniors are eligible.

Writing in the Physical and Natural Sciences

One award recognizes excellence in science writing for a general audience. Essays submitted in this category may present issues, controversies, phenomena, or experiments. They may take the form of arguments or explanations.

The other award recognizes excellence in reporting a scientific investigation or experiment that the author him/herself has done as a Guilford student. This essay should address a scientifically sophisticated audience. We will judge the essays on suitability for the intended audience, value to the intended audience, clarity, and scientific accuracy.

The Sue Keith Prize in Fiction

Fiction is an ancient and difficult art. The Dean’s Award for Fiction will celebrate the writer who best demonstrates a mastery of that art. Please submit one short story (no longer than 20 pages) for consideration.

The Betty Place Prize in Poetry

This prize honors the memory of Betty Place, librarian and lover of words.This award will be presented to the student who demonstrates, with passion and precision, a control of that art. Students must submit three poems.

Requirements

  • Essay/story entries are limited to one per student per contest. Students entering the poetry contest must submit three (3) poems.
  • Dean’s Award for First-Year Writing is limited to pieces produced in ENGL 101 or ENGL 102, or HP if course was completed during student’s first academic year.
  • Dean’s Award for Personal/Reflective Writing and Dean’s Award for Scholarly/Critical Writing are limited to Sophomores-Seniors.
  • All pieces should have been written during calendar year 2013.
  • Essays should be presented in the format appropriate to the academic disciplines in which they were prepared, or in the case of an interdisciplinary essay, in the standard form most appropriate for the essay.
  • There are no length specifications except that the fiction entry must be no longer than 20 pages.
  • The deadline for submissions is 5pm on Friday, April 4.

Submission Form

Click here to fill out the Dean's Writing Awards submission form.

English

Medieval literature meets zombies. Shakespeare. Poetry workshop. Cult movies. Rhetoric. Romantics. Writing, reading, analyzing, more writing!

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Envisioning a “typical” English course at Guilford College is like trying to envision a “typical” Guilford College student; thankfully, there is no “typical.” Our students’ interests drive them in different directions and at Guilford, we encourage these explorations. From introductory writing courses that push for cultural and critical analysis, to staff meetings for the campus newspaper and senior seminars where students present their scholarship to the Guilford community, the English department boasts a rich array of courses and a diverse set of professors and instructors who teach them.

While the material may be diverse, a common teaching goal runs throughout: by strengthening students’ creativity and critical thinking skills we are providing the tools they need to be more analytical and more aware of how differently we depict and define the complexities of the human condition. Living Guilford’s core values requires communication, and the English Department develops students’ abilities to read and write, and to talk about their reading and writing.

All Guilford students will spend time in English classes developing those skills. Students who major in English will benefit from one-on-one time with their professors. By expanding their cultural literacy, reading more and writing more, they will leave Guilford well prepared for careers in journalism, technical writing, advertising, creative writing, cultural studies, law and education.

Degree Offered

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in English.

English Majors

Major

The major requires a minimum of 32 credit hours (eight courses).

Students choose one of four tracks: general (32 credit hours), writing (32 credit hours), education studies (32 credit hours) or graduate studies (40 credit hours). Each track consists of a four-course Core, common to all the tracks, plus at least four Emphasis courses. Students develop a “plan of study” for their individually designed major as part of ENGL 200 and then monitor progress toward the major in course-selection meetings with their advisors.

Note: all English majors, whatever their track, must take at least one course in literature before 1830 (British) or 1865 (American) (ENGL 221, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 230, ENGL 240, ENGL 288, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327 or ENGL 342).

GENERAL TRACK
ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
One 200-level literature course
  • ENGL 206, ENGL  207, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 288
One 300-level literature course
  • ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, IDS 409, IDS 422
Three ENGL upper-level literature, writing, film courses or approved internship
  • ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 272, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 286, ENGL 287, ENGL 288, ENGL 290, ENGL 306, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, IDS 409, IDS 422
One emphasis course at the 300 level
  • ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, IDS 409, IDS 422

*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite 

Total credit hours required for A.B. degree in English general track – 32 credits

Writing Track

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
One 200-level literature course from: ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 288 - 4 credits
One 300-level literature course from: ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
 Choose two courses (8 credits)
ENGL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing - 4 credits
ENGL 208  Creative Nonfiction - 4 credits 
ENGL 211* Poetry Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 212** Fiction Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 282 Journalism - 4 credits
ENGL 285 Guilfordian Practicum - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite

CHOOSE ONE THEORY COURSE (4 credits)
ENGL 372 Modern Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 376 Contemporary Fiction - 4 credits
ENGL 380 Rhetoric and Composition - 4 credits
ENGL 382 Technical and Professional Communication - 4 credits
Internship or elective writing course (4 credits)
Choose from ENGL 205, 210, 211, 212, 282, 285, 372, 376, 380, 382. Internships can be done either off campus (e.g., Style magazine, News & Record ) or on campus (e.g., editorship with The Guilfordian or The Greenleaf Review).
Total credit hours required for A.B. degree in English writing track – 32 credits

Elementary Education Track

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
One 200-level literature course from: ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 288 - 4 credits
One 300-level literature course from: ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
Three ENGL upper-level literature, writing, film courses or approved internship from the following: ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 272, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 286, ENGL 287, ENGL 288, ENGL 290, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, ENGL 390, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite
One emphasis course at the 300 level from: ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
Total credits required for A.B. degree in English elementary education studies track – 32 credits

Secondary Education Studies Track

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
One 200-level literature course from: ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 288 - 4 credits
One 300-level literature course from: ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
Three ENGL upper-level literature, writing, film courses or approved internship from: ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 272, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 286, ENGL 287, ENGL 288, ENGL 290, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 382, ENGL 390, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite

ENGL 380 Rhetoric and Composition - 4 credits
Total credits required for A.B. degree in English secondary education studies track – 32 credits

Graduate Studies Track

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
One 200-level literature course from: ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 288 - 4 credits
One 300-level literature course from: ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
Five ENGL upper-level literature, writing, film courses or approved internship from: ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 240, ENGL 270, ENGL 272, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 286, ENGL 287, ENGL 288, ENGL 290, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, ENGL 390, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite

One emphasis course at the 300 level from: ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, IDS 409, IDS 422 - 4 credits
Total credits hours required for A.B. degree in English graduate studies track – 40 credits

The department recommends the following for the graduate studies track.

  • Taking some survey courses for a strong foundation (e.g., ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 225, ENGL 226);
  • Taking some depth courses for learning academic discourse and practicing analytical skills;
  • Doing an internship (teaching or research);
  • Doing an honors thesis or presenting research at a local or other conference;

The department also recommends:

  • Taking ENGL 400 early in the senior year (it will provide a writing sample for graduate school applications);
  • Taking the GRE in early fall semester of the senior year;
  • Gaining proficiency in a second language.

English Minors

Literature Track

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
ENGL 221 British Literature I - 4 credits
ENGL 222 British Literature II - 4 credits
ENGL 225 American Literature Survey I - 4 credits
ENGL 226 American Literature Survey II - 4 credits
ENGL 230 African American Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 270 World Literature - 4 credits
CHoose TWO courses (8 credits)
ENGL 306 Medieval Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 309 Early Modern Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 327 British Romantic Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 328 Victorian Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 331 Black Women Writers - 4 credits
ENGL 332 Black Men Writers - 4 credits
ENGL 334 African Women Writers - 4 credits
ENGL 342 American Romanticism - 4 credits
ENGL 372 Modern Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 376 Contemporary Fiction - 4 credits
ENGL 378 Caribbean Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
IDS 409 Gay, Lesbian, Queer Studies - 4 credits
IDS 422 Harlem Renaissance - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for English Literature Track Minor – 16 credits

Note: The department will periodically add courses to the above lists. Please check with the minor coordinator.

Students will develop a plan of study in ENGL 200. They will then process the coherence of the English minor via a portfolio of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship). Students will submit this portfolio to the English minor subcommittee of the Department of English.

The portfolio should include sample copies of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship) and a five-page reflective paper.

In this paper, which should neither summarize the four courses/internship nor the papers included in the portfolio, minors should reflect on their experience with the minor in light of the coherence plan they developed in ENGL 200. They might, for example: define their personal goals in undertaking the minor; demonstrate how and why those goals have or have not been achieved in the four chosen courses/internship; provide clear examples of how their experience in the courses/internship has informed and challenged their ways of thinking; and discuss what that change in thinking has meant to them and how they expect to utilize the knowledge and analytical skills gained in their careers and/or lives in the future.

Minors must meet with a member of the English minor subcommittee before beginning the paper.

Portfolios are due by the Monday of the 14th week of the semester.

Writing Track

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
CHOOSE TWO COURSES (8 credits)
ENGL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing - 4 credits
ENGL 208  Creative Nonfiction - 4 credits 
ENGL 211* Poetry Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 212** Fiction Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 282 Journalism - 4 credits
ENGL 285 Guilfordian Practicum - 4 credits
ENGL 382 Technical and Professional Communication - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or permission of instructor as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or pemission of instructor as prerequisite

CHOOSE ONE COURSE - students may not repeat any course from above (4 credits)
ENGL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing - 4 credits
ENGL 210 Playwriting Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 211* Poetry Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 212** Fiction Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 282 Journalism - 4 credits
ENGL 285 Guilfordian Practicum - 4 credits
ENGL 372 Modern Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 376 Contemporary Fiction - 4 credits
ENGL 380 Rhetoric and Composition - 4 credits
ENGL 382 Technical and Professional Communication - 4 credits
ENGL 390 Internship - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or permission of instructor as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or permission of instructor as prerequisite
Total credit hours required for English Writing Track Minor – 16 credits

Note: The department will periodically add courses to the above lists. Please check with the minor coordinator.

Students will develop a plan of study in ENGL 200. They will then process the coherence of the English minor via a portfolio of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship). Students will submit this portfolio to the English minor subcommittee of the Department of English.

The portfolio should include sample copies of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship) and a five-page reflective paper.

In this paper, which should neither summarize the four courses/internship nor the papers included in the portfolio, minors should reflect on their experience with the minor in light of the coherence plan they developed in ENGL 200. They might, for example: define their personal goals in undertaking the minor; demonstrate how and why those goals have or have not been achieved in the four chosen courses/internship; provide clear examples of how their experience in the courses/internship has informed and challenged their ways of thinking; and discuss what that change in thinking has meant to them and how they expect to utilize the knowledge and analytical skills gained in their careers and/or lives in the future.

Minors must meet with a member of the English minor subcommittee before beginning the paper.

Portfolios are due by the Monday of the 14th week of the semester.

English at Guilford

Why English at Guilford?

Medieval literature meets zombies. Shakespeare. Poetry workshop. Cult movies. Rhetoric. Romantics. Writing, reading, analyzing, more writing!

Envisioning a “typical” English course at Guilford College is like trying to envision a “typical” Guilford College student; thankfully, there is no “typical.” Our students’ interests drive them in different directions and at Guilford, we encourage these explorations. From introductory writing courses that push for cultural and critical analysis, to staff meetings for the campus newspaper and senior seminars where students present their scholarship to the Guilford community, the English department boasts a rich array of courses and a diverse set of professors and instructors who
teach them.

While the material may be diverse, a common teaching goal runs throughout: by strengthening students’ creativity and critical thinking skills we are providing the tools they need to be more analytical and more aware of how differently we depict and define the complexities of the human condition. Living Guilford’s core values requires communication, and the English Department develops students’ abilities to read and write, and to talk about their reading and writing.

All Guilford students will spend time in English classes developing those skills. Students who major in English will benefit from one-on-one time with their professors. By expanding their cultural literacy, reading more and writing more, they will leave Guilford well prepared for careers in journalism, technical writing, advertising, creative writing, cultural studies, law and education.

Experiential Learning Opportunities

Publications/Media Outlets

Awards
  • Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Award
  • Dean’s Writing Award Contests
  • O’Callaghan Award (Presented each April at the Campus Awards Convocation to a rising senior who is an outstanding English major.)
Internships
Internships are a great way to get academic credit while exploring vocational paths or discerning if a “dream job” is the right one for you. There are many opportunities on campus, in Greensboro, and farther afield–and we strongly encourage all majors to undertake one before graduating.

Past internships:

  • local publishing firm
  • independent filmmakers in San Francisco and Los Angeles
  • Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.
  • international media group (while attending Guilford’s study abroad London program)
  • community arts organizations
  • partnering with Guilford professors (conducting research or teaching, to prepare for graduate school)

Research
English majors are encouraged to embark on individual and/or group research projects to gain in-depth understanding of a subject of interest. Each year students have the opportunity to present these projects at the Guilford Undergraduate Symposium (GUS).

English Faculty