Academics

The Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Awards

About the Award

The Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Awards for English majors provide financial assistance to deserving English majors for career planning and preparation. There are two separate award categories: the Summer Practicum Award and the Post Graduate Award. The Summer Practicum Award is for rising seniors wishing to pursue further study or internship work in the summer before their final year at Guilford; the Post Graduate Award is for graduating seniors wishing to pursue post-grad study or some other vocational discernment activity crucial to the transition from student to professional. The awards total $25,000.00, with the amount of each individual award determined by the requests of winning applications.

These awards are offered because a generous alumna recognizes the value of academic and professional experiences that enhance opportunities for personal growth and enrichment. The awards are intended to aid English majors in making the transition from student into a career built upon skills learned as an English major at Guilford College. These awards are also intended to foster community and networking within the English major and Guilford College alumni and carry with them the responsibility to help mentor a new cadre of English majors toward their dream careers.

Award Specifics

Summer Practicum Award

Eligibility is open to all English majors with junior status heading into their final year at Guilford (rising seniors). The award must be used in the summer following the application—and the project undertaken must be completed by the beginning of the fall semester.  As such, the Summer Practicum Award is intended to support projects that will provide career preparation and aid in the vocational discernment process. Individual grants in this category are expected to range between $500 – $2,000. Applicants must clearly state how you will use the funds, the relevance of the project to your English major, how your project will further your vocational goals and why you are deserving of the award.

Past Summer Practicum proposals were awarded funds for:

  • Taking a particular course not offered at Guilford but essential to preparing for graduate school application to programs in English, creative writing or literature;
  • Undertaking an internship;
  • Formally working as a literacy volunteer or teaching assistant to see if this career path is for you;
  • Gaining a certificate or specialized training that will help you blend your writing skills with technology, medical, financial or legal fields.
Post-graduation Award

Eligibility is open to all graduating seniors with an English major, including those who have already graduated in the previous December. Post Graduation Award applications are welcomed from students who were awarded the Summer Practicum Award as rising seniors, but no preference will be given to these applicants. The award is meant to be used after graduation and the project undertaken should have clear boundaries.  This award is meant to support an English major’s transition from student to professional and to help students translate the skills they have learned as English majors into enter a career of their dreams.  Individual grants in this category are expected to range between $2000 -$5,000. Applicants must clearly state how the funds will be used, the relevance of the project to the English degree, how your project will further vocational goals and why this project is deserving of the award.

Past Post-Graduation proposals were awarded funds for students who:

  • decided to pursue a career in teaching and needed to fulfill the fifth year student-teaching requirement or wanted to teach abroad;
  • required supplemental income to take on a post-graduate internship or non-paying fellowship;
  • enrolled in a graduate or certificate program in a field related to English or writing;
  • pursued an apprenticeship in a specialized area of writing: medical, technical, legal, Web or financial writing.

Important notes for both award categories
We will only consider concrete, well-defined projects with built-in external accountability from a sponsoring agency, non-profit organization, university or residency program. If the nature or viability of your proposed project changes between application and award, the grant may be withheld or cancelled at the discretion of the committee and donor. Thus, it is important to clearly articulate a “back-up” plan if you are awaiting acceptance into an internship, residency or other competitive program for which you will apply the Gilbert Award.

Application Process

Interested applicants should complete the attached application and include an essay, observing the page limits.  A committee, including the donor, will evaluate the applications giving consideration to the following criteria: project viability, quality and coherence of the written proposal, relevance to skills learned while an English major and the strength of the entire application. (Handwritten, incomplete, inaccurate or late applications will not be accepted.)

This application consists of three parts:

  • Application Page  
  • Educational Objectives Essay: This is a two to three page formal essay proposal, detailing your project and how it will help you transition from earning an English degree to life beyond Guilford College. You should also be explicit about how the award would further your vocational objectives and should discuss the outcomes or end results of this project and/or grant. 
  • Budget

*It is important that your name appear only on the application page and not on the essay or budget, as the committee seeks blind submissions. Be sure to identify whether you are applying for a Summer Practicum or Post-Graduate award.

Deadline

Please submit completed application no later than 5:00 p.m., March 15 to:
Alan Mueller
Director, The Career and Community Learning Center
Guilford College 
5800 West Friendly Avenue 
Greensboro, NC 27410

Notification

Award recipients will be notified by April 10.

Follow-up Requirements
If your proposal is chosen, you will be expected to make regular progress reports, and provide a final project assessment, before receiving the last portion of funding.  The Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Award is also meant to encourage greater community-building and networking between alumni and current students in the English major. Thus, you will be expected to participate in a Gilbert Award alumni event or to act as an online mentor for other graduating English majors in the following year.

English and Creative Writing

Choose your adventure.

Expect many paths to choose from and a wide array of courses in literature and writing: rich fare for mind, heart and soul.

We will help you outfit yourself with provisions and the skills you will need to:

  • Sharpen your intellect for the literary trail, enabling you to comprehend, assess and appreciate life’s complexity
  • Read maps and theory with acumen and imagination, maps that will guide you through the terrain
  • Interpret and use the cultural codes and conventions of your time in history, and others
  • Cross borders and learn from the diversity that you encounter
  • Speak your truth while sharing your discoveries with fellow explorers, always loving language for its potential to express nuance and beauty
  • Report on your journeying in pellucid prose or verse: clearly, coherently, artfully
  • Synergize creatively with others in using what you have learned to transform the world

Choose the experiences you’ll take with you — joining the staff of our award-winning, nationally recognized campus newspaper or helping to create our eclectic student literary magazine. Applying for one of our Anderson Creative Writing Scholarships. Completing an internship in editing and publishing. Studying writing and literature in Europe, South America, Asia, the Caribbean or Africa.

The results? Once you complete your Guilford journey as an English major, you’ll have prepared yourself for an equally wide set of life paths with your new expertise—especially in critical thinking, empathy, tolerance for ambiguity, communication—expertise that can serve as a universal key to the professions.

And those who know you will appreciate you for the thoughtfulness, creativity and richness of the inner life you’ll have cultivated, traits you will carry forward as a lifelong learner and change agent.

Sample paths those before you have chosen: lawyer, Yale professor, National Public Radio national correspondent, peace worker in Haiti, Random House production manager, documentary filmmaker, “Charlie Rose” show assistant producer, novelist, CNN staff, minister, speechwriter, U.S. Air Force intelligence analyst, magazine editor, Bank of America diversity recruiter, librarian, community college instructor, canoe and kayak outfitter, Tarheel Monthly publisher, Shakespearean actor, brewmaster, London-based technical writer, recording studio production manager, Stanford digital information systems developer, BBC publicity coordinator, photojournalist, Screen Gems Studio producer, primary and secondary teachers, Congressional staff member, investigative reporter, Corcoran Gallery writing and research director, communication specialist, video game developer.

Graduate schools: University of California, Berkeley; Columbia University; Harvard University; University of Colorado; City University/London; University of Southern California; Brown University; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; City University of New York; University of Missouri, Columbia; State University of New York at Albany; Emerson College; University of Texas, Austin; North Carolina State University; University of Essex, England; University of Alaska; Brooklyn College, University of Pittsburgh; Pennsylvania State University; New York University.

Degree Offered

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in English and creative writing.

English Majors

English

The major requires a minimum of 36 credit hours (nine courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
One literature course before 1830 (brit.) or 1865 (u.s.) - 4 credits
  • ENGL 221, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 230, ENGL/REL 288, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 336, ENGL 342
One 300-level literature course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378
one introduction to genre, or American literature, or writing or film course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 210/THEA 244, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 215, ENGL 225, ENGL 226, ENGL 228, ENGL 230, ENGL 234, ENGL 275, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 286, ENGL 287, ENGL/REL 288, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, IDS 409, IDS 422
One introduction to genre, or British or world literature, or writing or film course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 210/THEA 244, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 215, ENGL 221, ENGL 222, ENGL 223, ENGL 270, ENGL 272, ENGL 275, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL/REL 288, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 372, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382
one 300-level course - 4 credits 
  • ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378, ENGL 380, ENGL 382 
one writing intensive course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 205, ENGL 208, ENGL 210/THEA 244, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**, ENGL 228, ENGL 282, ENGL 285***, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 380, ENGL 382
one practical application course or experience - 4 credits
  • ENGL 275, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 290, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, ENGL 390  

Internships can be done either off campus (e.g., Style magazine, News & Record) or on campus (e.g., editorship with The Guilfordian or The Greenleaf Review).

ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for A.B. degree in English – 36 credits 

*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite
*** Must be taken with advanced writing focus; instructor permission as prerequisite

Students develop a “plan of study” for their individually designed major as part of ENGL 200 and then monitor progress toward the major in course-selection meetings with their advisors.

Students can count one independent study toward the major as an elective. Independent studies cannot be used to satisfy one of the major’s five core requirements: ENGL 200, Literature before 1830 (Brit.) or 1865 (U.S.), 300-level literature course, practical application, ENGL 400.

Creative Writing

The creative writing major requires a minimum of 36 credits hours (nine courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
One literature course before 1830 (brit.) or 1865 (u.s.) - 4 credits
  • ENGL 221, ENGL 223, ENGL 225, ENGL 230, ENGL/REL 288, ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 336, ENGL 342
One 300-level literature course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 306, ENGL 309, ENGL 327, ENGL 328, ENGL 331, ENGL 332, ENGL 334, ENGL 336, ENGL 342, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 378
One introduction to genre course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 210/THEA 244
One workshop course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 208, ENGL 210/THEA 244, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**
One elective writing course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 205, ENGL 206, ENGL 207, ENGL 208, ENGL 210/THEA 244, ENGL 211*, ENGL 212**
One craft-intensive course - 4 credits
  • ENGL 228, ENGL 372, ENGL 376, ENGL 380
One practical application course or experience - 4 credits
  • ENGL 275, ENGL 282, ENGL 285, ENGL 290, ENGL 380, ENGL 382, ENGL 390

Internships can be done either off campus (e.g., Style magazine, News & Record) or on campus (e.g., editorship with The Guilfordian or The Greenleaf Review).

ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits

Total credits required for A.B. degree in creative writing is 36 credits.

*Requires ENGL 206 or instructor permission as prerequisite
** Requires ENGL 207 or instructor permission as prerequisite

Students develop a “plan of study” for their individually designed major as part of ENGL 200 and then monitor progress toward the major in course-selection meetings with their advisors.

For further details of all programs, see both individual course descriptions and the department’s advising guidelines, available from any department member. Students will take the introduction to the major (ENGL 200) when they declare the major (usually in the sophomore year) and the capstone course (ENGL 400) in their senior year.

NOTE: Both ENGL 102 and historical perspectives are prerequisites for all upper-level English courses except Journalism, Guilfordian Practicum and Playwriting. ENGL 250 and 350 Special Topics courses may fulfill literature or writing course requirements, depending upon topic.

English Minors

Literature Track

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
ENGL 221 British Literature I - 4 credits
ENGL 222 British Literature II - 4 credits
ENGL 225 American Literature Survey I - 4 credits
ENGL 226 American Literature Survey II - 4 credits
ENGL 230 African American Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 270 World Literature - 4 credits
CHoose TWO courses (8 credits)
ENGL 306 Medieval Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 309 Early Modern Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 327 British Romantic Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 328 Victorian Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 331 Black Women Writers - 4 credits
ENGL 332 Black Men Writers - 4 credits
ENGL 334 African Women Writers - 4 credits
ENGL 342 American Romanticism - 4 credits
ENGL 372 Modern Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 376 Contemporary Fiction - 4 credits
ENGL 378 Caribbean Literature - 4 credits
ENGL 400 Senior Seminar - 4 credits
IDS 409 Gay, Lesbian, Queer Studies - 4 credits
IDS 422 Harlem Renaissance - 4 credits

Total credit hours required for English literature track minor – 16 credits

Note: The department will periodically add courses to the above lists. Please check with the minor coordinator.

Students will develop a plan of study in ENGL 200. They will then process the coherence of the English minor via a portfolio of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship). Students will submit this portfolio to the English minor subcommittee of the Department of English.

The portfolio should include sample copies of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship) and a five-page reflective paper.

In this paper, which should neither summarize the four courses/internship nor the papers included in the portfolio, minors should reflect on their experience with the minor in light of the coherence plan they developed in ENGL 200. They might, for example: define their personal goals in undertaking the minor; demonstrate how and why those goals have or have not been achieved in the four chosen courses/internship; provide clear examples of how their experience in the courses/internship has informed and challenged their ways of thinking; and discuss what that change in thinking has meant to them and how they expect to utilize the knowledge and analytical skills gained in their careers and/or lives in the future.

Minors must meet with a member of the English minor subcommittee before beginning the paper.

Portfolios are due by the Monday of the 14th week of the semester.

Writing Track

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credit hours (four courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
CHOOSE TWO COURSES (8 credits)
ENGL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing - 4 credits
ENGL 208  Creative Nonfiction - 4 credits 
ENGL 211* Poetry Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 212** Fiction Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 282 Journalism - 4 credits
ENGL 285 Guilfordian Practicum - 4 credits
ENGL 382 Technical and Professional Communication - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or permission of instructor as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or pemission of instructor as prerequisite

CHOOSE ONE COURSE - students may not repeat any course from above (4 credits)
ENGL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing - 4 credits
ENGL 210 Playwriting Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 211* Poetry Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 212** Fiction Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 282 Journalism - 4 credits
ENGL 285 Guilfordian Practicum - 4 credits
ENGL 372 Modern Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 376 Contemporary Fiction - 4 credits
ENGL 380 Rhetoric and Composition - 4 credits
ENGL 382 Technical and Professional Communication - 4 credits
ENGL 390 Internship - 4 credits
*Requires ENGL 206 or permission of instructor as prerequisite
**Requires ENGL 207 or permission of instructor as prerequisite
Total credit hours required for English writing track minor – 16 credits

Note: The department will periodically add courses to the above lists. Please check with the minor coordinator.

Students will develop a plan of study in ENGL 200. They will then process the coherence of the English minor via a portfolio of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship). Students will submit this portfolio to the English minor subcommittee of the Department of English.

The portfolio should include sample copies of work done in the four courses in the minor (or three courses plus internship) and a five-page reflective paper.

In this paper, which should neither summarize the four courses/internship nor the papers included in the portfolio, minors should reflect on their experience with the minor in light of the coherence plan they developed in ENGL 200. They might, for example: define their personal goals in undertaking the minor; demonstrate how and why those goals have or have not been achieved in the four chosen courses/internship; provide clear examples of how their experience in the courses/internship has informed and challenged their ways of thinking; and discuss what that change in thinking has meant to them and how they expect to utilize the knowledge and analytical skills gained in their careers and/or lives in the future.

Minors must meet with a member of the English minor subcommittee before beginning the paper.

Portfolios are due by the Monday of the 14th week of the semester.

Creative Writing

The minor allows students to gain practice in the craft of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry and/or playwriting while exploring both the imaginative and the practical potential of learning to more readers through the power of artful language. Students pursuing the minor study the formal and aesthetic conventions that shape literature and creative writing in its various genres; draft, revise and polish their own creative writing; read and study models in specific genres; and gain introductory experience in both theory and the practice of being a creative writer.

Course experience includes workshop settings in which students share and learn from each other’s creative work; literary study and discussion; and hands-on experience in the professional presentation of creative tests.

Consisting of four courses, the minor is designed to offer students an introductory yet concrete understanding of the forms and audiences of imaginative writing. It will benefit students from other majors who want to explore their own creative abilities, and those whose major studies and career aspirations can be directly enhanced by a more powerful understanding of how creative language can move the minds and heart-students, for example, interested in careers in education, law, activism, politics, business and the arts.

The minor in creative writing is not available to creative writing majors.

The minor requires a minimum of 16 credits hours (four courses).

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies - 4 credits
CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
ENGL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing - 4 credits
ENGL 206 Introduction to Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 207 Introduction to Fiction- 4 credits
ENGL 208 Creative Nonfiction - 4 credits
ENGL 210/THEA 244 Playwriting Workshop - 4 credits
CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
ENGL 208 Creative Nonfiction - 4 credits
ENGL 210/THEA 244 Playwriting Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 211  Poetry Workshop - 4 credits 
ENGL 212  Fiction Workshop - 4 credits 
CHOOSE ONE COURSE (4 credits)
ENGL 206 Introduction to Poetry - 4 credits
ENGL 207 Introduction to Fiction- 4 credits
ENGL 208 Creative Nonfiction - 4 credits
ENGL 210/THEA 244 Playwriting Workshop - 4 credits
ENGL 211  Poetry Workshop - 4 credits 
ENGL/REL 228  American Nature Writing - 4 credits 
ENGL 372  Modern Poetry - 4 credits 
ENGL 376  Contemporary Fiction - 4 credits 
ENGL 280  Rhetoric and Composition - 4 credits 

Total credit hours required for creative writing minor - 16 credits.

English at Guilford

Why English at Guilford?

Medieval literature meets zombies. Shakespeare. Poetry workshop. Cult movies. Rhetoric. Romantics. Writing, reading, analyzing, more writing!

Envisioning a “typical” English course at Guilford College is like trying to envision a “typical” Guilford College student; thankfully, there is no “typical.” Our students’ interests drive them in different directions and at Guilford, we encourage these explorations. From introductory writing courses that push for cultural and critical analysis, to staff meetings for the campus newspaper and senior seminars where students present their scholarship to the Guilford community, the English department boasts a rich array of courses and a diverse set of professors and instructors who teach them.

While the material may be diverse, a common teaching goal runs throughout: by strengthening students’ creativity and critical thinking skills we are providing the tools they need to be more analytical and more aware of how differently we depict and define the complexities of the human condition. Living Guilford’s Core Values requires communication and the English Department develops students’ abilities to read and write and to talk about their reading and writing.

All Guilford students will spend time in English classes developing those skills. Students who major in English will benefit from one-on-one time with their professors. By expanding their cultural literacy, reading more and writing more, they will leave Guilford well prepared for careers in journalism, technical writing, advertising, creative writing, cultural studies, law and education.

Experiential Learning Opportunities

Publications/Media Outlets
Awards
  • Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Award
  • Dean’s Writing Award Contests
  • O’Callaghan Award (Presented each April at the Campus Awards Convocation to a rising senior who is an outstanding English major.)
Internships

Internships are a great way to get academic credit while exploring vocational paths or discerning if a “dream job” is the right one for you. There are many opportunities on campus, in Greensboro, and farther afield–and we strongly encourage all majors to undertake one before graduating.

Past internships:

  • local publishing firm
  • independent filmmakers in San Francisco and Los Angeles
  • Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.
  • international media group (while attending Guilford’s study abroad London program)
  • community arts organizations
  • partnering with Guilford professors (conducting research or teaching, to prepare for graduate school)
  • Book marketing in New York City
  • Editing and marketing with a North Carolina literary magazine
  • Children's Book Council in New York City
Research

English majors are encouraged to embark on individual and/or group research projects to gain in-depth understanding of a subject of interest. Each year students have the opportunity to present these projects at the Guilford Undergraduate Symposium (GUS).

English Faculty